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Sometimes when an object is created with a pointer to another object, this means it is responsible for destroying the other object on destruction... other times it is not. Sometimes there are even cases where it can vary depending on circumstances, rather than fixed rules for each class.

Very simple example:

class A
{
private:
 B *b;
public:
 A(B *_b)
 {
  if(_b)b = _b; //A should NOT destroy b
  else b = new B(); //A should destroy b
 }
}

In A::~A() you then end up needing to know. Of course you could have a little boolean flag but I wondered if there is any well-used pattern here? Or even a name of this behavior I can put in code comments so another developer will have more of a clue?

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I would rather call this an antipattern. An object should either own the other object (with explicit transfer of ownership if necessary), or not own it (and then not delete it at all). Your example implies that objects of class A are behaving differently depending on how they have been initialized, which is surprising for users. –  Philipp Mar 3 '12 at 18:04
    
But, passing NULL to indicate a class should use a default implementation, IS common. –  John Mar 3 '12 at 18:08
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4 Answers

The general idea is called "Smart Pointer", in your specific example, you need a shared_ptr.

class A {
  std::shared_ptr<B> b;
public:
  A(std::shared_ptr<B> b = std::make_shared<B>())
    : b(b) {}
};

Note that you have to use boost::shared_ptr if std::shared_ptr is not available on your compiler.

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A smart pointer doesn't control which object is responsible for another's destruction though, does it - it simply allows automatic deletion when there are no references? –  John Mar 3 '12 at 18:05
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In an ideal case you should handle all dynamic objects through smart pointers with self-describing semantics (and pass references around for access, or something like boost::optional for optional references).

Your example might look like this:

class A
{
    std::unique_ptr<B> bptr;
public:
    A(std::unique_ptr<B> && b) : bptr(b ? b : new B) { }

    B       & b()       { return *bptr; }
    B const & b() const { return *bptr; }
};
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A common pattern is to use shared_ptr to imply shared ownership and std::unique_ptr or even the maligned std::auto_ptr to convey transfer of ownership.

If the constructor for A took an shared_ptr<B>, then A's destructor will delete the object only if there are no more shared pointers.

On the other hand, the constructor for A took an auto_ptr<B>, then the code constructing the A will no longer have access to the B pointer. So it's clear that A is solely responsible for its destruction now.

In both cases, the ownership is enforced by the code itself.

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You could handle this with two pointers, one smart, one dumb:

class A
{
private:
    B *b;
    std::unique_ptr<B> ub; 
public:
    A(B *_b)
    {
        if(_b)
            b = _b;
        else
        {
            ub.reset(new B);
            b = ub.get();
        }
    }
};

Within the class, you would deal with the object through the dumb pointer, but the unique_ptr would be responsible for its lifetime if a null pointer was passed in.

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