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I have seen this syntax in a program but I am not sure what happens at the return part. What does the ||(or) mean? Does this mean that the method returns true when at least one of a and b is true and returns false when both of them are false?

    bool A::truthValue() {
    bool a = true;
    bool b = true;
    if(........)
       a= false;
    if(........)
       b=false

    return (a || b);
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It will return true if either b or a is true. This means that the result is (see table):

a | b | result
t | t | t
f | t | t
t | f | t
f | f | f

Actually in your specific case, false will be returned only if both if statements become true.

EDIT So - your suggestion is correct.

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It means return true if a or b is true.

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Does this mean that the method returns true when at leas one of a and b is true and returns false when both of them are false?

It means exactly that.

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More precisely: The || operator will first evaluade the expression on the left side. If it is true, the expression on the right side is ignored and the whole || expression evaluades to true. If the left expression is false, the right expression is evaluated; if it is true the whole || expression evaluades true, otherwise false.

This behavior is well defined and not trivial. This logic exlusion applies to all logic operators in C++, which allows things like:

if (p && *p != '\0')

Which would not be allowed, if this rule would not exist.

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