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I'm currently trying to merge a tag into a branch. The tag is not, I would consider, of an unusual format but Git persists on displaying Vim to enter a merge message even with one supplied in the command. Take the following for example:

git merge --no-ff -m "Released v1.1.0.1 to master." v1.1.0.1

I believe it has something to do with the tag format. I have tried merging branches and tags without full stops inside but the above ceases to complete without bypassing vim. I was just wondering if anybody had any advice on this issue?

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Have a quick browse through the Stackoverflow FAQ, particularlly the linked section; your posts are already "signed" with your standard user card, rendering your signature unnecessary. :) –  simont Mar 3 '12 at 21:39
    
My apologies. Signature removed. –  Dan Lister Mar 3 '12 at 21:45
    
My git does not open editor when I do this. May be hack like EDITOR=/bin/true git merge ... will work (if useful message is pre-populated in the text editor)? –  Vi. Mar 3 '12 at 23:37
    
Yeah mine doesn't usually either. For merging of branches, it works fine but when trying to merge a tag, it appears. I got around the issue by creating a temporary branch for merging, cleaning up after myself once fully merged. –  Dan Lister Mar 3 '12 at 23:49
    
So the obvious workaround of just typing Released v1.1.0.1 to master. into the editor didn't work? –  Kaz Mar 14 '12 at 3:42
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I just tried this with this version:

david@davids-imac:~/t (master) $ git --version
git version 1.7.5.4

on Mac OS X 10.7 and, unless I misunderstood your question, it worked just fine. Maybe you are on a different OS/bash that is interpreting the '.' differently? My bash version is:

3.2.48(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin11)

See below for the steps I took:

david@davids-imac:~/t $ git init
Initialized empty Git repository in /Users/david/t/.git/
david@davids-imac:~/t (master #) $ echo "hi" > t
david@davids-imac:~/t (master #%) $ git add t
david@davids-imac:~/t (master #) $ git commit -m 'added t'
[master (root-commit) 5f959d8] added t
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 t

One commit on master now. Next, the new branch and a tag:

david@davids-imac:~/t (master) $ git checkout -b branch1
Switched to a new branch 'branch1'
david@davids-imac:~/t (branch1) $ echo "hello" > hello
david@davids-imac:~/t (branch1 %) $ git add .
david@davids-imac:~/t (branch1 +) $ git commit -m 'added hello'
[branch1 affb79a] added hello
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 hello
david@davids-imac:~/t (branch1) $ git tag v1.1.0.1

I now have a branch with a separate commit and that commit is tagged 'v1.1.0.1'.

Now to add one more commit to master (just to make sure the branches have diverged) and merge:

david@davids-imac:~/t (branch1) $ git checkout master
Switched to branch 'master'
david@davids-imac:~/t (master) $ echo "yo" > yo
david@davids-imac:~/t (master %) $ git add .
david@davids-imac:~/t (master +) $ git commit -m 'added yo'
[master 93b09c4] added yo
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 yo
david@davids-imac:~/t (master) $ git log
commit 93b09c421e1939e3e85738fd5bd4d03b6429e729
Author: David Brown <david@davtar.org>
Date:   Wed Mar 14 20:24:13 2012 -0600

    added yo

commit 5f959d85a3059c189121c2b8687788c4384f9e6a
Author: David Brown <david@davtar.org>
Date:   Wed Mar 14 20:23:01 2012 -0600

    added t
david@davids-imac:~/t (master) $ git merge --no-ff -m "Released v1.1.0.1 to master." v1.1.0.1
Merge made by recursive.
 hello |    1 +
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 hello

The merge succeeded without opening any editor:

david@davids-imac:~/t (master) $ git log
commit ac2c62b86c3e631aeda27be601fcc92a9df61146
Merge: 93b09c4 affb79a
Author: David Brown <david@davtar.org>
Date:   Wed Mar 14 20:24:34 2012 -0600

    Released v1.1.0.1 to master.

commit 93b09c421e1939e3e85738fd5bd4d03b6429e729
Author: David Brown <david@davtar.org>
Date:   Wed Mar 14 20:24:13 2012 -0600

    added yo

commit affb79a9d72732b3250b7dca9cc8085b6f36faff
Author: David Brown <david@davtar.org>
Date:   Wed Mar 14 20:23:30 2012 -0600

    added hello

commit 5f959d85a3059c189121c2b8687788c4384f9e6a
Author: David Brown <david@davtar.org>
Date:   Wed Mar 14 20:23:01 2012 -0600

    added t
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How strange. The steps you produced above are pretty much the same as mine. Yet on my Windows environment, the editor refuses to be bypassed even when a merge message is present. Strange. Thanks for investigating. –  Dan Lister Mar 15 '12 at 13:42
    
Ahh, yes, bash on windows can be a finicky thing. Have you tried adding quotes, single or double, around the tag name? –  David M. Brown Mar 15 '12 at 14:10
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