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I have this question regarding memory allocation and deallocation in c++. Here is the situation: I have a method foo which allocates memory and then returns that object:

Object foo () {
  Object *a = new Object();
  // Do something with this object...
  return *a;
}

and another method which uses this returned object:

void bar () {
  Object a = foo();
  // Do something..
}

And my question is, at which point should i deallocate the memory I have allocated? When i return from the method foo, does the method bar get a copy of that object on its stack, or does it get access to that one object somewhere in memory?

Thanks! Bart

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2  
You shouldn't allocate the memory via new at all here –  PlasmaHH Mar 3 '12 at 21:50
    
@PlasmaHH - why not? –  Martin James Mar 3 '12 at 21:56
    
because youre not returning a pointer, but a copy of the object. –  P3trus Mar 3 '12 at 21:58
    
@MartinJames: because there is absolutely no need for it, he is even returning a copy of the object, returning a copy of an autostorage object would be more efficient, and leak less memory. –  PlasmaHH Mar 3 '12 at 22:00
    
Oh, never mind - loking at bar(), it returns a pointer into an object - would that even compile? Should it not be 'Object a*=foo();' –  Martin James Mar 3 '12 at 22:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't deallocate that object. It's lost. It's a memory leak. You never should have (dynamically) allocated it in the first place. Your code should have looked like this:

Object foo () {
  Object a;
  // Do something with this object...
  return a;
}

When i return from the method foo, does the method bar get a copy of that object on its stack, or does it get access to that one object somewhere in memory?

It's a copy of the still existing inaccessible object.

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Doesn't this allocate the memory on the stack? –  user1096294 Mar 3 '12 at 21:56
    
@user1096294: Yes, it does. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 3 '12 at 21:59
    
@user1096294: Actually, I should correct myself before a language lawyer hounds me. The object gets allocated with automatic storage duration, which in practice, usually means that it gets allocated on the stack. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 3 '12 at 22:17
    
@user1096294: Yes the value is created localy but the result gets copy constructed to the destination with the return statement. So it is a copy that ends up at the call point and the local copy is destroyed. (Note: you may not see the actually copy as the compiler is allowed to optimize away the copy with some nifty optimizations but the affect is the same) –  Loki Astari Mar 3 '12 at 23:26

Youre leaking memory because you are not returning the object you allocated, but a copy of it. The easiest solution is to not use new at all

Object foo () {
  Object a;
  return a;
}

If you really need the object on the heap, e.g. if it's a polymorphic object and your're returning a pointer to the base class it would look like

Base* foo () {
  Base *a = new Derived();
  return a;
}

But this code is far from good. It's not exception save which can lead to memory leaks as well. Therefore you should almost always wrap a new with a smart pointer like std::unique_ptr(only c++11), std::auto_ptr or boost::shared_ptr.

std::unique_ptr<Base> foo () {
  std::unique_ptr<Base> a(new Derived();
  return a;
}
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Allocating memory with new tells the compiler: "don't worry, I know what I'm doing: this object will be controlled by me". That means, the compiler will, indeed, not worry about it and you are put in charge. The best solution is: don't do it unless you really know what you are doing. Note, that I'm pretty sure that I know what I'm doing and still I normally don't use new because there is no need!

In your example, you want to use

Object foo() {
    Object a;
    // do something
    return a;
}

Conceptually, the object is created on the stack and copied when it is returned. After the copy is done, the local object is destroyed. In practice, this is rarely what really happens: since the local object is destroyed right after it is copied, the compiler is given freedom to do what you normally want and that is: the object a isn't copied or destroyed but actually returned directly. However, this should yield the same result (if it does not, your class is broken somewhere).

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Do you mean that we return an object from the stack of a method? Doesn't this mean that the object would get overwritten at some point? –  user1096294 Mar 3 '12 at 22:00
1  
When the compiler elides the copy it knows what it is doing and won't overwrite it during its life-time. Note that the object you returned from your function is a copy of the object you allocated with new (and the newed object is probably leaked unless it gets registered somewhere which takes care of the object). –  Dietmar Kühl Mar 3 '12 at 22:19

In this example you can't. Since the caller function will never know where (or even aware) a dynamically object was created. If you were to use references (or pointers) then it would be the callers responsibility to release it when finished using it.

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You should never delete a reference. And you can never tell if you should delete a pointer (without reading the documentation) and thus this is very error prone. As a result we don't pass objects by pointer when ownership is in question in C++ (to do so would be very C like). Instead we pass smart pointers which define the ownership semantics of the dynamically allocated object or we return by value (which is probably the best solution). As RVO and NRVO will make the cost of the value copy nothing. –  Loki Astari Mar 3 '12 at 23:32

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