Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm using Thor and trying to output YAML to a file. In irb I get what I expect. Plain text in YAML format. But when part of a method in Thor, its output is different...

class Foo < Thor
  include Thor::Actions

  desc "bar", "test"
  def set
    test = {"name" => "Xavier", "age" => 30}
    puts test
    # {"name"=>"Xavier", "age"=>30}
    puts test.to_yaml
    # !binary "bmFtZQ==": !binary |-
    #   WGF2aWVy
    # !binary "YWdl": 30
    File.open("data/config.yml", "w") {|f| f.write(test.to_yaml) }
  end
end

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
I just ran your example and it gave me perfectly fine output. I ran thor 0.14.6. –  Maran Mar 3 '12 at 23:14
    
Thanks for taking the time to check. I'm at a loss of what to do at this point. I'm using Ruby 1.9.3p125 if that makes any difference what so ever. :) –  cp3 Mar 4 '12 at 2:00
1  
I installed 1.9.3 and ran it again, and indeed binary output. I noticed YAML got upgraded during install. It probably has something to do with that upgraded version. –  Maran Mar 4 '12 at 8:05
    
Thanks Maran. I assume yaml is built into ruby, would it be easier to rvm install 1.9.2 rather than install 1.9.3 w/ the downgraded version of yaml? –  cp3 Mar 4 '12 at 9:14
    
Yeah, as soon as I issue rvm 1.9.2 everything works again, yaml wise. If you don't need 1.9.3 I would switch back to 1.9.2 –  Maran Mar 4 '12 at 12:22

3 Answers 3

All Ruby 1.9 strings have an encoding attached to them.

YAML encodes some non-UTF8 strings as binary, even when they look innocent, without any high-bit characters. You might think that your code is always using UTF8, but builtins can return non-UTF8 strings (ex File path routines).

To avoid binary encoding, make sure all your strings encodings are UTF-8 before calling to_yaml. Change the encoding with force_encoding("UTF-8") method.

For example, this is how I encode my options hash into yaml:

options = {
    :port => 26000,
    :rackup => File.expand_path(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), "../sveg.rb"))
}
utf8_options = {}
options.each_pair { |k,v| utf8_options[k] = ((v.is_a? String) ? v.force_encoding("UTF-8") : v)}
puts utf8_options.to_yaml

Here is an example of yaml encoding simple strings as binary

>> x = "test"
=> "test"
>> x.encoding
=> #<Encoding:UTF-8>
>> x.to_yaml
=> "--- test\n...\n"
>> x.force_encoding "ASCII-8BIT"
=> "test"
>> x.to_yaml
=> "--- !binary |-\n  dGVzdA==\n"
share|improve this answer

After version 1.9.3p125, ruby build-in YAML engine will treat all BINARY encoding differently than before. All you need to do is to set correct non-BINARY encoding before your String.to_yaml.

in Ruby 1.9, All String object have attached a Encoding object and as following blog ( by James Edward Gray II ) mentioned, ruby have build in three type of encoding when String is generated: http://blog.grayproductions.net/articles/ruby_19s_three_default_encodings.

One of encoding may solve your problem => Source code Encoding

This is the encoding of your source code, and can be specify by adding magic encoding string at the first line or second line ( if you have a sha-bang string at the first line of your source code ) the magic encoding code could be one of following:

  • # encoding: utf-8
  • # coding: utf-8
  • # -- encoding : utf-8 --

so in your case, if you use ruby 1.9.3p125 or later, this should be solved by adding one of magic encoding in the beginning of your code.

# encoding: utf-8
require 'thor'
class Foo < Thor
  include Thor::Actions

  desc "bar", "test"
  def bar
    test = {"name" => "Xavier", "age" => 30}
    puts test
    #{"name"=>"Xavier", "age"=>30}
    puts test["name"].encoding.name
    #UTF-8
    puts test.to_yaml
    #---
    #name: Xavier
    #age: 30
    puts test.to_yaml.encoding.name
    #UTF-8
  end
end
share|improve this answer

I have been struggling with this using 1.9.3p545 on Windows - just with a simple hash containing strings - and no Thor.

The gem ZAML solves the problem quite simply:

require 'ZAML'
yaml = ZAML.dump(some_hash)
File.write(path_to_yaml_file, yaml)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.