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I've been looking at this reccurrence and wanted to check if I was taking the right approach.

T(n) = T(n^(1/2)) + 1
= T(n^(1/4)) + 1 + 1
= T(n^(1/8)) + 1 + 1 + 1
...
= 1 + 1 + 1 + ... + 1 (a total of rad n times)
= n^(1/2)

So the answer would come to theta bound of n^(1/2)

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5  
Verify it with Wolphram Alpha. –  Ani Mar 3 '12 at 22:36
1  
oh that is pretty cool thanks –  ftsk33 Mar 3 '12 at 22:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

hint: assume n = 22m or m = log2log2n, and you know 22m-1 * 22m-1 = 22m so, if you define S(m)=T(n) your S will be:

S(m) = S(m-1)+1 → S(m) = Θ(m) → S(m)=T(n) = Θ(log2log2n)

extend it for general case.

In recursion like T(n) = T(n/2) + 1 you will reduce height of tree 2 times in each iteration which leads to Θ(logn) but in this case, you will reduce input number by power of two (not two times) so it will be Θ(log log n ).

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I will take another look –  ftsk33 Mar 3 '12 at 22:44
    
@ftsk33, I edited my answer to make it more sensible. –  Saeed Amiri Mar 3 '12 at 22:55
    
so this means the the height of the recurrence tree is log log n? –  ftsk33 Mar 3 '12 at 22:58
    
Yes exactly it is log log n (in base 2), in fact sqrt reduces value in power of 2 ( not two times). –  Saeed Amiri Mar 3 '12 at 22:59
    
ok cool thanks a lot –  ftsk33 Mar 3 '12 at 23:00

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