Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to write a Python class that acts like some sort of datastore. So instead of using a dictionary for example, I want to access my data as class.foo and still be able to do all the cool stuff like iterate over it as for x in dataclass.

The following is what I came up with:

class MyStore(object):
    def __init__(self, data):
        self._data = {}
        for d in data:
            # Just for the sake of example
            self._data[d] = d.upper()

    def __iter__(self):
        return self._data.values().__iter__()

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self._data)

    def __contains__(self, name):
        return name in self._data

    def __getitem__(self, name):
        return self._data[name]

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return self._data[name]


store = MyStore(['foo', 'bar', 'spam', 'eggs'])
print "Store items:", [item for item in store]
print "Number of items:", len(store)
print "Get item:", store['foo']
print "Get attribute:", store.foo
print "'foo' is in store:", 'foo' in store

And, apparently it works. Hooray! But how do I implement the setting of an attribute correctly? Adding the following ends up in an recursion limit on __getattr__:

def __setattr__(self, name, value):
    self._data[name] = value

Reading the docs, I should call the superclass (object) __setattr__ method to avoid recursion, but that way I can't control my self._data dict.

Can someone point me into the right direction?

share|improve this question
    
why not just add the iteration stuff to a normal object, and use its __dict__ instead of your dict? –  Not_a_Golfer Mar 3 '12 at 22:52
    
You can increase the recursion limit with sys.setrecursionlimit(), btw. –  Joel Cornett Mar 4 '12 at 1:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this:

def __setattr__(self, name, value):
    super(MyStore, self).__setattr__(name, value)
    self._data[name] = value

However, you could save yourself a lot of hassle by just subclassing something like dict:

class MyStore(dict):

    def __init__(self, data):
        for d in data:
            self[d] = d.upper()

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return self[name]

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        self[name] = value

store = MyStore(['foo', 'bar', 'spam', 'eggs'])
print "Store items:", [item for item in store]
print "Number of items:", len(store)
print "Get item:", store['foo']
print "Get attribute:", store.foo
print "'foo' is in store:", 'foo' in store
store.qux = 'QUX'
print "Get qux item:", store['qux']
print "Get qux attribute:", store.qux
print "'qux' is in store:", 'qux' in store

which outputs...

Store items: ['eggs', 'foo', 'bar', 'spam']
Number of items: 4
Get item: FOO
Get attribute: FOO
'foo' is in store: True
Get qux item: QUX
Get qux attribute: QUX
'qux' is in store: True
share|improve this answer
    
Aha, subclassing dict saves me work indeed. I only had to add the __iter__ method from the question so I get the values and not the keys when iterating over the class. Thanks! –  Timo Mar 4 '12 at 19:11
    
Sure, although given that you're creating a dict-like structure that has keys and values, it might have made more sense to leave the iteration going over keys and use the already-provided .itervalues() method if you want to iterate over values. :) –  Amber Mar 4 '12 at 19:16
    
Fair enough, but since I'm always interested in the values once the class is created, this saves me to call .itervalues(). Your comment made me change the return line to return self.itervalues() though, it looks better. –  Timo Mar 4 '12 at 21:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.