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How can I let a module to be included by another module look for a constant inside the including module? In other words, how can I make B.foo and D.foo below give the expected results?

module A
    module_function
    public
    def foo; C end
end
module B
    extend A
    C = "foo in B"
end
module D
    extend A
    C = "foo in D"
end

B.foo #=> (Expected) "foo in B"
D.foo #=> (Expected) "foo in D"
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to tell it to lookup C in the context of where A is extended in:

module A
  def foo
    self::C
  end
end

module B
  extend A
  C = "foo in B"
end

module D
  extend A
  C = "foo in D"
end

B.foo #=> "foo in B"
D.foo #=> "foo in D"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Can you explain why module_function was unnecessary? –  sawa Mar 3 '12 at 23:19
1  
@sawa, because when you call Object#extend, you are adding the instance methods of the modules passed as argument to the receiver. If the receiver is a Module object, its instance methods are actually the "class methods". module_function makes it so the methods are defined as instance methods on the module's singleton class (metaclass) instead. –  Matheus Moreira Mar 3 '12 at 23:26
1  
@sawa As far as I can tell, module_function only changes the behavior if you plan on redefining A.foo at some point. And also only possible when the module is being mixed-in to a class, not another module. Though I'm not 100% sure, as I don't have any prior experience with using it and the docs aren't particularly enlightening. (@MatheusMoreira replied first, and I'll defer to him) –  Andrew Marshall Mar 3 '12 at 23:28
    
Thanks for the explanation. –  sawa Mar 3 '12 at 23:38
1  
More details. Consider: o = Object.new; def o.foo. Only o will respond_to? :foo. Now, consider the Ruby idiom: class A; def self.foo. self is actually A, so this can be rewritten as class A; end; def A.foo. These are not just similar, they are exactly the same. All objects have a singleton class which hold the singleton methods only they respond to, and this applies to Class and Module objects. And since the singleton class is also an object... –  Matheus Moreira Mar 3 '12 at 23:43

I recommend creating an attribute initializer that may be used by the other modules:

module A
  # This is actually executed in the context of each individual object.
  # Since all modules and classes are also objects, each module extended
  # by A gets to set its own state which the other methods can then use.
  def attribute(*args)
    @value = args.first if args.any?
    @value || :default
  end

  def foo
    attribute.to_s
  end
end

module B
  extend A
  attribute :from_B
end

module C
  extend A
  attribute :from_C
end

module D
  extend A
end

B.foo  # => "from_B"
C.foo  # => "from_C"
D.foo  # => "default"
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Thanks. I believe yours will work, but the required coding seems to depart from what I wanted. –  sawa Mar 3 '12 at 23:22
    
+1 because this is still good even if its not what the OP is looking for. –  Andrew Marshall Mar 3 '12 at 23:29

You can't do this with constants, because they aren't inherited, but you can with methods:

module A
  def foo
    c
  end
end

module B
  extend A
  def self.c
     "foo in B"
  end
end

module D
  extend A
  def self.c
    "foo in D"
  end
end

B.foo #=> "foo in B"
D.foo #=> "foo in D"
share|improve this answer
1  
Inherit isn't really the right word to use when talking about modules. –  Andrew Marshall Mar 3 '12 at 23:16
    
@Andrew - Sure it is. Including modules modifies the chain of ancestors. –  nicholaides Mar 4 '12 at 21:52

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