Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

imagine you have the following interfaces:

public interface IInterfaceA : IInterfaceX
{
    //
    // declarations
    //
}

public interface IInterfaceB : IInterfaceX
{
    //
    // declarations
    //
}

public interface IInterfaceC : IInterfaceX
{
    //
    // declarations
    //
}

Now I want to replace the following three methods which perform almost the same with a single function:

class SomeClass
{
    IInterfaceA myVarA;
    IInterfaceB myVarB;
    IInterfaceC myVarC;

    void SomeMethodA(IInterfaceX someVarX)
    {
        myVarA = (IInterfaceA)someVarX;
    }

    void SomeMethodB(IInterfaceX someVarX)
    {
        myVarB = (IInterfaceB)someVarX;
    }

    void SomeMethodC(IInterfaceX someVarX)
    {
        myVarC = (IInterfaceC)someVarX;
    }
}

I thought about something like:

void SomeMethod(IInterfaceX targetVar, IInterfaceX someVarX)
{
    //
    // here's my problem
    //
    targetVar = (CastIDontKnowHowToPerform)someVarX;
}

which is used sth. like

SomeMethod(myVarA, someVarX);        
SomeMethod(myVarB, someVarX);        
SomeMethod(myVarC, someVarX);

So my questions are:

  • Is it possible what I want to get?

  • How to perform this cast I don't know how to perform?

  • Perhaps a design pattern is more appropriate

I'm just looking for the best way to refactor those three functions by replacing them by a single one.

Things I've tried so far: I used things like object.GetType() and object.GetType().GetInterfaces() which works well to get the type of an object or its interface(s) but none to set the type of an object to its interface.

Hope you can help me...

Regards,

Inno

[EDIT] Ah, damn it... after clicking "Ask your question" and having a short look at it this seems to a be typical case for a generic function (or a template in C++-term). [/EDIT]

share|improve this question
    
C++ templates allow more than C# generics, they aren't equivalent. –  workmad3 Jun 5 '09 at 9:53
    
No, they are not equivalent but in C++ you would use a template for this. –  Inno Jun 5 '09 at 11:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted
void SomeMethod<T>(out T targetVar, IInterfaceX someVarX) where T: IInterfaceX
{
       targetVar = (T) someVarX;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is definitely the best way to do it. –  Noldorin Jun 5 '09 at 9:56
    
Do you need the 'out' keyword ? –  Julien Poulin Jun 5 '09 at 10:01
    
Yes, you need "out", since we are changing the value of targetVal, rather than merely modifying what targetVal references. –  James Curran Jun 6 '09 at 11:05

One possibility is the "is" operator:

void SomeMethod(IInterfaceX someVarX)
{
    if (someVarX is IInterfaceA)
        SomeMethodA((IInterfaceA)someVarX);
    else if (...
}

A better method would be to put the operation into the IInterfaceX to avoid casting altogether:

void SomeMethod(IInterfaceX someVarX)
{
    someVarX.SomeMethod();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.