Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My goal is to:

  • On mouse over, fade out 'foo' and fade in 'bar'
  • On mouse out, fade out 'bar' and fade in 'foo'

I'm able to fade out 'foo' on mouse over, but I'm not able to fade in 'bar' and then return to normal state when I move the mouse outside the 'bar' div.

I have the following code:

html

<ul>
  <li>
    <div class="foo"></div>
    <div class="bar"></div>
  </li>
  <li>
    <div class="foo"></div>
    <div class="bar"></div>
  </li>
</ul>

css

li .bar { display: none; }

js

// On mouse over, fade out 'foo' and fade in 'bar'
jQuery('.foo').mouseover(function() {
  jQuery(this).fadeOut(function() {
    jQuery('.bar').fadeIn(); <-- This is wrong. I need to get the bar inside this li
});

// On mouse out, fade out 'bar' and fade in 'foo'
jQuery('.bar').blur(function() {
  jQuery(this).fadeOut(function() {
    jQuery('.foo').fadeIn();
});

Here is my bad jsFiddle attempt: http://jsfiddle.net/TvCT5/2/

Appreciate a push in the right direction :)

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is this the effect you're looking for?

jsFiddle example

jQuery:

jQuery('.foo').mouseover(function(){
    jQuery(this).fadeOut(function(){jQuery(this).siblings().fadeIn();});
});
jQuery('.bar').mouseout(function(){
    jQuery(this).fadeOut(function(){jQuery(this).siblings().fadeIn();});
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

The general design pattern is as follows. Instead of this:

jQuery('.bar').fadeIn();

use this to find the .bar object with a common <li> parent with the object that triggered the event:

jQuery(this).closest("li").find('.bar').fadeIn();

or because your two items are siblings, you can more simply use this:

jQuery(this).siblings('.bar').fadeIn();

This finds the nearest ancestor that is an <li> tag and then finds the .bar object in that ancestor which will be the one that matches up with the trigger of the event.

The full code would look like this:

// On mouse over, fade out 'foo' and fade in 'bar'
jQuery('.foo').mouseover(function() {
  jQuery(this).fadeOut(function() {
    jQuery(this).siblings('.bar').fadeIn();
});

// On mouse out, fade out 'bar' and fade in 'foo'
jQuery('.bar').blur(function() {
  jQuery(this).fadeOut(function() {
    jQuery(this).siblings('.foo').fadeIn();
});

It's a bit unusual to pair .mouseover() with .blur() since those aren't matched pairs, but using .mouseover() and .mouseout() may also have issues because you're hiding the object that triggers the .mouseover().

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I meant to use mouseout and not blur. It didn't quite work with your first solution. I think j08691 beat you to it :) +1 for good explanation! –  Steven Mar 4 '12 at 0:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.