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Why does this code (unassigned temporary variable constructed from a const char* variable):

class A
{
public:
    A(const char*) {}
};

int main()
{
    const char* constCharPointerVariable = "StringLiteral";
    A(constCharPointerVariable);
    return 0;
}

Give these errors?

error C2512: 'A' : no appropriate default constructor available
error C2040: 'constCharPointerVariable' : 'A' differs in levels of indirection from 'const char *'

Whereas this code (assigned temporary variable constructed from a const char* variable):

class A
{
public:
    A(const char*) {}
};

int main()
{
    const char* constCharPointerVariable = "StringLiteral";
    A a(constCharPointerVariable);
    return 0;
}

Gives no errors.

And this code (unassigned temporary variable constructed from a const char* variable static_cast to a const char*):

class A
{
public:
    A(const char*) {}
};

int main()
{
    const char* constCharPointerVariable = "StringLiteral";
    A(static_cast<const char*>(constCharPointerVariable));
    return 0;
}

Gives no errors.

Bonus points if you can provide the section number in the C++ specification that specifies the first code sample to be not allowed.

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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted
A(constCharPointerVariable);

This is actually a declaration of a variable of type A named constCharPointerVariable. It does not create a temporary object.

If you used clang, you'd get the more helpful error message:

error: redefinition of 'constCharPointerVariable' with a different type
    A(constCharPointerVariable);
      ^

As a simpler example, the following is invalid because it declares two int objects in the same scope, both named x:

int x(0);
int (x);

As for why the code is parsed this way, you can find the syntax rules for Declarators in §A.7 of C++11. Basically, when you declare a variable, you can enclose its name in any number of parentheses.

Relevant productions include:

  • declarator -> ptr-declarator
  • ptr-declarator -> noptr-declarator | declarator-id
  • noptr-declarator -> ( ptr-declarator )
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+1 - how does anyone remember all this stuff...? Note that parens around the whole thing will turn it into an expression, making it OK. I guess it's a good thing that we don't often want expressions that are nothing but a single temporary object (though I could see a possible, if still unlikely, use for it with an RAII class). –  Michael Burr Mar 4 '12 at 0:16
    
@MichaelBurr: It would in any event be terrible class design. If you want something that just does something once, you should probably make it a function instead. –  Kerrek SB Mar 4 '12 at 0:20
    
Thanks James, I wasn't aware of that syntax. Your answer is the second time I've heard about clang's well-worded error messages. The first time was from this talk at Microsoft: channel9.msdn.com/Events/GoingNative/GoingNative-2012/… –  Neil Justice Mar 4 '12 at 0:32
    
@NeilJustice: It's a great tool, and Chandler's presentation is excellent (I attended the Going Native 2012 conference). I should note that Visual C++ and EDG both emit very similar and equally helpful errors. –  James McNellis Mar 4 '12 at 0:34
    
@MichaelBurr: I had to compile the code to figure out what was wrong :-P. I could never remember all this stuff. –  James McNellis Mar 4 '12 at 0:35
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