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I have a lab assignment and I'm dwelled on about removing html tags. Here is method for removing html tags:

public String getFilteredPageContents() {
    String str = getUnfilteredPageContents();
    String temp = "";
    boolean b = false;
    for(int i = 0; i<str.length(); i++) {
        if(str.charAt(i) == '&' || str.charAt(i) == '<') {
            b = true;
        }
        if(b == false) {
            temp += str.charAt(i);
        }
        if(str.charAt(i) == '>' || str.charAt(i) == ';') {
            b = false;
        }
    }
    return temp;
}

And here is my text's earliest form:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//IETF//DTD HTML//EN">
<html>

<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type"
content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<meta name="GENERATOR" content="Microsoft FrontPage 2.0">
<title>A Shropshire Lad</title>
</head>

<body bgcolor="#008000" text="#FFFFFF" topmargin="10"
leftmargin="20">

<p align="center"><font size="6"><strong></strong></font>&nbsp;</p>
<div align="center"><center>

<pre><font size="7"><strong>A Shropshire Lad
</strong></font><strong>
by A.E. Housman
Published by Dover 1990</strong></pre>
</center></div>

<p><strong>This collection of sixty three poems appeared in 1896.
Many of them make references to Shrewsbury and Shropshire,
however, Housman was not a native of the county. The Shropshire
of his book is a mindscape in which he blends old ballad meters,
classical reminiscences and intense emotional experiences
&quot;recollected in tranquility.&quot; Although they are not
particularly to my taste, their style, simplicity and
timelessness are obvious even to me. Below are two short poems
which amused me, I hope you find them interesting too.</strong></p>

<hr size="8" width="80%" color="#FFFFFF">
<div align="left">

<pre><font size="5"><strong><u>
XIII</u></strong></font><font size="4"><strong>

When I was one-and-twenty
I heard a wise man say,
'Give crowns and pounds and guineas
But not your heart away;</strong></font></pre>
</div><div align="left">

<pre><font size="4"><strong>Give pearls away and rubies
But keep your fancy free.
But I was one-and-twenty,
No use to talk to me.</strong></font></pre>
</div><div align="left">

<pre><font size="4"><strong>When I was one-and-twenty
I heard him say again,
'The heart out of the bosom
Was never given in vain;
'Tis paid with sighs a plenty
And sold for endless rue'
And I am two-and-twenty,
And oh, 'tis true 'tis true.

</strong></font><strong></strong></pre>
</div>

<hr size="8" width="80%" color="#FFFFFF">

<pre><font size="5"><strong><u>LVI . The Day of Battle</u></strong></font><font
size="4"><strong>

'Far I hear the bugle blow
To call me where I would not go,
And the guns begin the song,
&quot;Soldier, fly or stay for long.&quot;</strong></font></pre>

<pre><font size="4"><strong>'Comrade, if to turn and fly
Made a soldier never die,
Fly I would, for who would not?
'Tis sure no pleasure to be shot.</strong></font></pre>

<pre><font size="4"><strong>'But since the man that runs away
Lives to die another day,
And cowards' funerals, when they come,
Are not wept so well at home,</strong></font></pre>

<pre><font size="4"><strong>'Therefore, though the best is bad,
Stand and do the best, my lad;
Stand and fight and see your slain,
And take the bullet in your brain.'</strong></font></pre>

<hr size="8" width="80%" color="#FFFFFF">
</body>
</html>

And when implement my method on this text:

 charset=iso-8859-1">

A Shropshire Lad







A Shropshire Lad

by A.E. Housman
Published by Dover 1990


This collection of sixty three poems appeared in 1896.
Many of them make references to Shrewsbury and Shropshire,
however, Housman was not a native of the county. The Shropshire
of his book is a mindscape in which he blends old ballad meters,
classical reminiscences and intense emotional experiences
recollected in tranquility. Although they are not
particularly to my taste, their style, simplicity and
timelessness are obvious even to me. Below are two short poems
which amused me, I hope you find them interesting too.
.
.
.

My question is: How can I get rid of that little code at the very beginning of text charset=iso-8859-1">. I can't get away from that bunch of code? Thanks...

share|improve this question
    
you can start by avoiding the use of frontpage. tools like that can be convenient in exchange for proper code –  Joseph the Dreamer Mar 4 '12 at 0:48
    
Avoiding FrontPage is probably a good idea. But I thought the assignment is to process HTML code, regardless of where it might come from? –  Nayuki Minase Mar 4 '12 at 0:51
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can see that your intent is to remove stuff that looks like <xxx> and &xxx;. You're using the variable b to remember whether you're currently skipping stuff or not.

Did you notice that your algorithm will skip things of the form <xxx; and &xxx>? Namely, & or < will cause skipping to begin, and > or ; will cause skipping to end, but you don't have to match < with >, or & with ;. So how about implementing code to remember which character started the skip?

A further complication, though, is that &xxx; stuff can be embedded in <xxx> stuff, like this: <p title="&amp;">

Incidentally, temp += str.charAt(i); will make your program very slow when the string is long. Look at using StringBuilder instead.


Here is some code that should solve your problem or nearly so:

import java.util.Stack;

public String getFilteredPageContents() {
    String str = getUnfilteredPageContents();
    StringBuilder() temp = new StringBuilder();

    // The closing character for each thing that we're inside
    Stack<Character> expectedClosing = new Stack<Character>();

    for(int i = 0; i<str.length(); i++) {
        char c = str.charAt(i);
        if(c == '<')
            expectedClosing.push('>');
        else if(c == '&')
            expectedClosing.push(';');

        // Is the current character going to close something?
        else if(!expectedClosing.empty() && c == expectedClosing.peek())
            expectedClosing.pop();

        else {
            // Only add to output if not currently inside something
            if(expectedClosing.empty())
                temp.append(c);
        }
    }
    return temp.toString();
}
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This is a school assignment, but any chance you could use a well formed HTML parser such as this for the job?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not be able to use external libraries or parsers for this assignment.. –  El3ctr0n1c4 Mar 4 '12 at 9:49
add comment

The most elegant way to solve this scenario would probably be using regular expressions. With them you could specifically search for tag structures and remove them from the output.

However, as you already have coded a program and it works fine except for the problem you mentioned, a quick & dirty solution might suffice.

One thing I can think of would be applying a filter-like algorithm that scans the text output line by line and removes them if they are present. Like reading each line and checking if the last character is a >. If it is remove the line / replace it with an empty string. In normal text there shouldn't be any > and the end of a sentence, so you shouldn't have too much trouble there.

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