Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a function inbetweenbst: int int BST -> ilist, used as (inbetweenbst i j t), that produces a list of all the keys in the consumed BST t that are strictly between i and j. If there are not any elements in t with a key in this range then the function should produce an empty list. Assume i ≤ j

Also i have to make sure the running time must be O(n), where n is the number of elements in t, and not use mutation.

I have come up with the following code, which basically changes the tree to have only right nodes:

(define (bst->list t)
  (cond
    [(empty? t) empty]
    [else
     (append (bst->list (BST-left t)) (cons (BST-key t) empty) (bst->list (BST-right t)))]))


(define (list->bst lst)
  (cond
    [(empty? lst) empty]
    [else (make-BST (first lst) empty (list->bst (rest lst)))]))

(define (inbetweenbst i j t)
  (define bst (list->bst (bst->list t)))
  (cond
   [(empty? bst) empty]
   [(and (> (BST-key bst) i) (< (BST-key bst) j))
             (cons (BST-key bst) (inbetweenbst i j (BST-right bst)))]
   [else (inbetweenbst i j (BST-right bst))]))

But i think my code run's in O(n^2) .... any suggestions to make it run O(n) ... I'm pretty i can't use append since its an O(n) function, I'm only restricted to cons ... im lost on ideas, any suggestion would help ? =D

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe the procedure bst->list can be written in a much simpler and efficient way like this:

(define (bst->list t)
  (let inorder ((tree t)
                (acc empty))
    (if (empty? tree)
        acc
        (inorder (BST-left tree)
                 (cons (BST-key tree)
                       (inorder (BST-right tree)
                                acc))))))

In the above code, I'm not using append to build a list of all the keys, only cons operations. After that, building a procedure that filters the keys in the required range should be trivial:

(define (in-between-bst i j t)
  (filter <???>
          (bst->list t)))

EDIT :

Here's the bst->list procedure, without using let and using cond instead of if:

(define (bst->list t)
  (inorder t empty))

(define (inorder tree acc)
  (cond ((empty? tree)
         acc)
        (else
         (inorder (BST-left tree)
                  (cons (BST-key tree)
                        (inorder (BST-right tree)
                                 acc))))))
share|improve this answer
    
is there a way to code it without let and if, since i have not seen those expressions before? –  Thatdude1 Mar 4 '12 at 7:35
    
@Beginnernato OK, I rewrote the bst->list procedure, now it doesn't use a named let (I used a helper procedure instead). But how come you haven't seen an if before? it's just a cond with only two alternatives, and practically every popular programming language has it, in one form or another! –  Óscar López Mar 4 '12 at 14:37
    
Thank you i think you figured it out .. i know about if, it's jsut that in racket i was used to using cond and local definitions instead of let –  Thatdude1 Mar 4 '12 at 16:13

Begin by thinking about the recursive method to convert a tree to a list by an in-order walk. Append the result of a recursive call to the left child of the tree, then the current node, then the result of a recursive call to the right child of the tree; the recursion stops when you reach a null node.

Now convert that to a method that operates only on the nodes within the desired range. The only difference is that the recursion stops when you reach a null node, or when you reach a node that is outside the desired range.

In your code, you already have the first function, called bst->list. All you have to do is modify the function to add another cond clause (after the empty? and before the else) to return the empty tree when you are outside the desired range. There is no need for the variable bst, which is just t.

share|improve this answer
    
since append runs in O(n), wouldn't this technique have a runtime of O(n^2) ? –  Thatdude1 Mar 4 '12 at 1:21
    
If it's hard for you to reason about the runtime, do an experiment. Create a bst with 10000 random keys and time the function that extracts the keys from the two middle quartiles. Do the same at 20000 keys and 40000 keys. Do the times increase linearly or quadratically? –  user448810 Mar 4 '12 at 1:35

As a hint on eliminating append calls, consider a simpler function that just flattens an S-expression into a list of atoms. Here's the naive version:

;; flatten : S-expr -> (listof atom)
(define (flatten x)
  (cond [(null? x)
         null]
        [(pair? x)
         (append (flatten (car x))
                 (flatten (cdr x)))]
        [else
         (list x)]))

Here's an alternative version. Instead of recurring and appending, it uses an auxiliary function that takes an extra parameter that contains the flattened list of everything to the right of the current argument.

;; flatten : S-expr -> (listof atom)
(define (flatten x)
  (flatten* x null))

;; flatten* : S-expr (listof atom) -> (listof atom)
(define (flatten* x onto)
  (cond [(null? x)
         onto]
        [(pair? x)
         (flatten* (car x)
                   (flatten* (cdr x) onto))]
        [else
         (cons x onto)]))

You may be able to adapt this technique to your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
can x be a tree? .... how will i recurse the left and right at the same time thou ? –  Thatdude1 Mar 4 '12 at 7:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.