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I know there have been numerous questions here about inline sql vs stored procedures... I don't want to start another one like that! This one is about inline (or dynamic) sql.

I also know this point has become more or less moot with Linq to SQL and its successor Entity Framework.

But... suppose you have chosen (or are required by your superiors) to work with plain old ADO.NET and inline (or dynamic) sql. What are then the best practices for this and for formatting the sql?

What I do now is the following: I like to create my SQL statements in a stored procedure first. This gives me syntax coloring in SQL Server Management Studio and the ability to test the query easily without having to execute it in code through the application I'm developing.

So as long as I'm implementing/debugging, my code looks like this:

    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("myDbConnectionString"))
    {
        conn.Open();
        using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd.CommandText = "myStoredProcName";
            // add parameters here
            using (SqlDataReader rd = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                // read data and fill object graph
            }
        }
    }

Once the debugging and testing phase is done, I change the code above like this:

    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("myDbConnectionString"))
    {
        conn.Open();
        using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            cmd.CommandText = GetQuery();
            // add parameters here
            using (SqlDataReader rd = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            {
                // read data and fill object graph
            }
        }
    }

And I add an extra private method e.g. GetQuery() in which I copy/paste the whole block of the stored procedure like this:

    private string GetQuery()
    {
        return @"
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    SELECT col1, col2 from tableX where id = @id

    -- more sql here
        ";
    }

Working like this has the benefit that I can revert the code easily to call the stored procedure again if I have to debug/update the sql code later, and once it's done I can easily put the sql code back with copy/paste, without having to put quotes around every line and stuff like that.

Is it good practice to include newlines in the query?
Are there other things or tricks that I haven't thought of which can make this approach better?
How do you guys do things like this?
Or am I the only one who still uses (has to use) inline sql?

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2  
LINQ-to-SQL is not "officially dead"; it is still a supported product with ongoing development; simply, EF is getting the focus for new features. –  Marc Gravell Jun 5 '09 at 10:36
    
sorry was just quoting something i found in other questions here... removed it ;-) –  fretje Jun 5 '09 at 10:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Inline (with or without the literal @"..." syntax) is fine for short queries... but for anything longer, consider having the tsql as a file in the project; either as embedded resources / resx, or as flat files. Of course, by that stage, you should probably make it a stored procedure anyway ;-p

But having it as a separate file forces the same separation that will make it a breeze to turn into a stored procedure later (probably just adding CREATE PROC etc).

One issue with inline - it makes it so tempting for somebody to concatenate user input... which is obviously bad (you've correctly used parameters in the example).

share|improve this answer
    
yes indeed, the parameters are another reason to put everything in a stored procedure first... I never concatenate sql! –  fretje Jun 5 '09 at 10:41
    
well i do concatenate sql sometimes (to adhere to the DRY principle)... but I never concatenate it with user input ;-) –  fretje Jun 5 '09 at 10:43
    
If you put it in flat files, how do you get it into the command then? –  fretje Jun 5 '09 at 10:45
    
By reading the file; of course, if you use resx you get a helper property automatically. –  Marc Gravell Jun 5 '09 at 11:06
1  
resx would be my preference - so no, you wouldn't deploy anything. Just create a resource file and a few tsql files, and drag the tsql onto the resource designer surface... job done. –  Marc Gravell Jun 5 '09 at 11:43

I've used .NET resource files in the past. These were handy for keeping a library of all queries used in a particular code library, particularly when the same query might be used in multiple places (yes, I realize this also indicates some poor design, but sometimes you need to work within the box given to you).

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