Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I get the detail informations from a specific .png file in PowerShell?
Like dimensions, bit depth and size.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can get most of this information from the files extended properties like this:

$path = 'D:\image.png'
$shell = New-Object -COMObject Shell.Application
$folder = Split-Path $path
$file = Split-Path $path -Leaf
$shellfolder = $shell.Namespace($folder)
$shellfile = $shellfolder.ParseName($file)

$width = 27
$height = 28
$Dimensions = 26
$size = 1

$shellfolder.GetDetailsOf($shellfile, $width)
$shellfolder.GetDetailsOf($shellfile, $height)
$shellfolder.GetDetailsOf($shellfile, $Dimensions)
$shellfolder.GetDetailsOf($shellfile, $size)

You can also get the size in other ways such as (Get-Item D:\image.png).Length / 1KB.

The bit depth property doesn't seem to be listed in the extended properties though even though its available when you right click the file.

Update Another option is to use .NET proper to avoid using COM:

add-type -AssemblyName System.Drawing
$png = New-Object System.Drawing.Bitmap 'D:\image.png'
$png.Height
$png.Width
$png.PhysicalDimension
$png.HorizontalResolution
$png.VerticalResolution

Update 2 The PixelFormat property gives you the bit depth.

$png.PixelFormat

The property is an enumeration of possible formats. You can view the complete list here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.drawing.imaging.pixelformat.aspx

For example Format32bppArgb is defined as

Specifies that the format is 32 bits per pixel; 8 bits each are used for the alpha, red, green, and blue components.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I finally choose to use Wia.ImageFile. with which I can get more simply some infomations (like bit depth). –  Etienne Mar 4 '12 at 18:45
    
@Etienne I added another option. You can use .NET and avoid using COM. –  Andy Arismendi Mar 4 '12 at 19:01
    
Thank you for your last update. I am a beginner in PowerShell, so if I understand it's best to use .NET instead of COM? With Wia.ImageFile I also found IsIndexedPixelFormat, IsAlphaPixelFormat, IsExtendedPixelFormat and IsAnimated, which are interesting for my needs. I have not managed to find them with the System.Drawing. Thank you very much for your answer, this is very appreciated. Etienne. –  Etienne Mar 5 '12 at 3:34
    
@Etienne You can use COM however some COM objects are installed with specific applications and some are only available in specific versions of Windows so you have to watch out for those when you distribute you script. –  Andy Arismendi Mar 5 '12 at 8:06

The Scripting Guy wrote an article about getting files metadata based on Shell.Application http://blogs.technet.com/b/heyscriptingguy/archive/2008/08/13/how-can-i-find-files-metadata.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this article, very interesting. In my case I prefer to use the Wia.ImageFile, more simple for my needs. Thanks for your answer. –  Etienne Mar 4 '12 at 18:34
  • You might want to use the PowershellPack Module which contains get-image:

    PS D:\> import-module psimagetools
    PS D:\> get-item .\fig410.png | get-image
    FullName              : D:\fig410.png
    FormatID              : {B96B3CAF-0728-11D3-9D7B-0000F81EF32E}
    FileExtension         : png
    FileData              : System.__ComObject
    ARGBData              : System.__ComObject
    Height                : 450
    Width                 : 700
    HorizontalResolution  : 96,0119934082031
    VerticalResolution    : 96,0119934082031
    PixelDepth            : 32
    IsIndexedPixelFormat  : False
    IsAlphaPixelFormat    : True
    IsExtendedPixelFormat : False
    IsAnimated            : False
    FrameCount            : 1
    ActiveFrame           : 1
    Properties            : System.__ComObject
    
  • or you could use Wia.ImageFile directly (which is how the get-image function does it) this way:

    PS D:\> $image  = New-Object -ComObject Wia.ImageFile
    PS D:\> $image.loadfile("D:\fig410.png")
    PS D:\> $image
    
    FormatID              : {B96B3CAF-0728-11D3-9D7B-0000F81EF32E}
    FileExtension         : png
    FileData              : System.__ComObject
    ARGBData              : System.__ComObject
    Height                : 450
    Width                 : 700
    HorizontalResolution  : 96,0119934082031
    VerticalResolution    : 96,0119934082031
    PixelDepth            : 32
    IsIndexedPixelFormat  : False
    IsAlphaPixelFormat    : True
    IsExtendedPixelFormat : False
    IsAnimated            : False
    FrameCount            : 1
    ActiveFrame           : 1
    Properties            : System.__ComObject
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, with Wia.ImageFile I get exactly the information I needed. –  Etienne Mar 4 '12 at 18:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.