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I am very disappointed in Java for not allowing the following code to move as concurrently as it could. When there is no synchronization, the two threads switch more often, but when attempting to access a synchronized method, it will take way too long (like 30 seconds) before the second thread gets the lock, and again before the first thread gets the lock from the second. What coding can take care of sharing the lock better:

   public synchronized static void i()
   {

     System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName());

    }
    public static void main(String[] f)
   {

   Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable(){
    public void run()
   {
       while(true)
       i();
     }});
    t.setName("a: ");
    Thread t2 = new Thread(new Runnable(){
     public void run()
     {
       while(true)
        i();
      }});
      t2.setName("b: ");
      t.start();
      t2.start();

    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use ReentrantLock with fairness set true.

public static final ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock(true);
public static void i()
{
    lock.lock();
    try {
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName());

    } finally {
        lock.unlock();
    }
}
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2  
Combine exabrial's and Chikei's answers and you have the total correct answer. Fairness is not guaranteed by default for the reasons exebrial noted. But with regard to interleaving, I would go with Chikei's suggestion of using a lock that makes some fairness guarantees. If you want 'perfect' interleaving, i.e. thread B always run after thread A and before thread A is allowed to run again, you'll need yet a different locking scheme. –  brettw Mar 4 '12 at 5:44
    
thanks very much, both methods seem to work very well –  Sam Adams Mar 4 '12 at 5:54

The problem isn't java, it's your code. What part of a lock contract implies fair acquisition? It's MUCH faster and efficient for to simply let an existing lock holder continue; usually they'll finish their work up and release the lock anyway. Your program should make 0 assumptions about fairness of locks and thread interleaving.

If you want a fair interleave, you shouldn't be using synchronized methods. You would need to create a private Object, then manually use a wait() and notify() methods on that private object to force interleaving, but even then that's an assumption :) To make sure you get fair interleaving you'll have to create a volatile condition variable indicating who's turn it is to execute.

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Excellent this works perfect –  Sam Adams Mar 4 '12 at 5:51

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