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if there is a volatile variable passed in a function something like below...

Does this function always return a square value, I mean sometimes can the value change as there is a volatile variable declared.

Basically, I am trying to say is that the variable which is passed is a volatile. Hope, I am clear. But, if I make passing of a by reference that would change the whole scenario... am I right??

volatile int a;
int main()
{
   function(a);
   return 1;
}
int function b(int a)
{

    int x=a;

    int y=a;

    return x*y;

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The volatile qualifier tells the compiler that the variable may change not that it will change. It cannot spontaneously change in any case; something has to cause it to change - even if that cause is external to the code.

The code is erroneous in this case (or at least does not exemplify the effect of volatile in the way perhaps you intended) because the parameter passed to function() is not declared volatile. The fact that it has the same name as the global variable is perhaps confusing, but by assigning the global variable a to the function argument a, you have immediately decoupled it from the volatility.

If the code were modified (and made valid and compilable) thus:

volatile int a;

int function( void )
{
    int x=a;
    int y=a;

    return x*y;
}

int main()
{
   function();
   return 1;
}

Then effect of volatile here is simply that the compiler will explicitly assign x and y without applying any optimisations that would otherwise be possible. Without the qualifier, the compiler might otherwise (when optimisations are enabled) reduce function() to just:

int function( void )
{
    return a * a ;
}

and might even in-line the entire function. Further, since the return value of function is not assigned to anything, the compiler would likley optimise the entire code to just

int main()
{
   return 1;
}

If a is volatile, then the assignments to x and y must occur if function() is called.

The purpose of volatile is to indicate to the compiler that a variable may change outside of the code that the compiler has generated (not that it will change). It is typically used to ensure correct behaviour when a variable references either a hardware register, or memory that is shared between threads, processes, or even processors or cores within a processor. It can also be used to prevent "optimising out" of code that is required, (such as empty busy-wait loop counters for example). In your example (or rather my revision of it), a does not reference any such entity, so the code will behave as expected, but perhaps be less efficient that it might otherwise be.

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But if I do something like this... –  Invictus Mar 4 '12 at 9:03
    
int square(volatile int *ptr) { int a,b; a = *ptr; b = *ptr; return a * b; } –  Invictus Mar 4 '12 at 9:03
    
and call Square(&a).... Now this will give me different values... I hope I am right.... Am I?? –  Invictus Mar 4 '12 at 9:04
    
I think my answer on thjis was clear; why do you think it would be different? If nothing changes the value at the global a, then the value will not change! In your case a is not explicitly initialised and is static so the answer will always be zero. –  Clifford Mar 4 '12 at 10:21
    
Good answer, but not entirely correct. The compiler may never optimize out that function, because reading a volatile variable is a side effect. According to C99 5.1.2.3 the compiler may only optimize out code if it can ensure that no side effects take place. On certain hardware, a (volatile) read access of a CPU register might clear/set certain flags, meaning that the read itself actually modifies external sources. And some hardware might need a dummy read before it is used, etc. Since the OP flagged their post as embedded, this is particularly important. –  Lundin Mar 5 '12 at 14:16

There is no relation between the global-scope volatile int a and the function-scope int a parameter. They are entirely independent, and any reference to a inside of the function refers to the int a parameter. The volatile int a is never used at all in this program.

If you were to pass the volatile int a as an argument into the function, it would make no difference, because the value of that a would be read once and copied to the function's a parameter, which is not itself volatile.

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So, you mean if I have a function b(volatile int a) as parameter ... will it make a difference.....?? –  Invictus Mar 4 '12 at 7:08
1  
That would be most unusual. What are you trying to accomplish? –  James McNellis Mar 4 '12 at 7:10
    
I am trying to say if I declare function b(volatile int a).... then the value gets copied but if the value is volatile does it tell the compiler to copy its memory location... that is my confusion. –  Invictus Mar 4 '12 at 7:42
    
If I make function b(volatile int *a) that will return different values... Just wanted to clearify on this... –  Invictus Mar 4 '12 at 7:56

It always returns a square unless integer overflow happens, in which case the behavior is undefined. The volatile is completely irrelevant (I would call it a red herring) however because the global volatile variable a is not even in scope at the point where the other a is read. The function argument a shadows the global variable, and since it has automatic storage duration and its address is never taken, it's completely immune to any sort of external modification.

Of course there are still plenty of ways you could corrupt your program state by invoking undefined behavior and find that the return value is not a square. UB is fun like that..

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