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I am writting a shell script which includes a couple of awk lines

the awk line looks like:

cat input.csv | awk -F, '$1~/$1/ {print "is good"}'

the first $1 is the first column of the input csv, the second $1 is supposed to be the first command line input of this shell script

I tried to put a \ in front of the second $, but it seems to be not working.

Can anyone help?

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3 Answers 3

A variable is fine too.

awk -F, -v needle="$1" '$1 ~ needle {print "is good"}' < input.csv
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Good idea about the extra variable. I guess that eliminates any problem where $1 may contain special characters, does it? –  Adrian Pronk Mar 4 '12 at 8:19
3  
Every character is special in its own way. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 4 '12 at 8:20
cat input.csv | awk -F, '$1~/'"$1"'/ {print "is good"}'

You need to close the ' string, insert the shell $1 (inside " in case there are special characters), then reopen the ' string.

And you may want to check whether the $1 from shell contains / characters which will upset the regular expression.

And as @Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams indicated, you don't need to pipe the output of cat to awk, you can just get awk to read the file directly. That is:

cat input.csv | awk ...

can be simplified to:

awk ... < input.csv
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That doesn't actually tell awk to read the file. It tells the shell to feed it directly into awk's stdin instead of using cat. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 4 '12 at 8:15
    
@Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams: I know but I didn't want to get into too much complication. –  Adrian Pronk Mar 4 '12 at 8:18
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams The redirection does not "feed it directly into awk's stdin". The file becomes awk's stdin. The useless use of cat feeds the content of the file to awk's stdin, and that useless I/O is why UUOC is inefficient. –  William Pursell Mar 4 '12 at 13:36

cat or a redirection isn't needed. Here is a third variant using backslash:

awk -F, "\$1~/$1/ {print \"is good\"}" input.csv
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