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I'm trying to run a short section of my code that gets 2 ranges off of one spreadsheet, 1 range off of another, and create a new sheet. The code I am using is as follows:

var names = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getSheetByName("Availability").getRange(2, 2, 19, 1);
var availability = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getSheetByName("Availability").getRange(2, 2, 19, 6);
var needs = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getSheetByName("Needs").getDataRange();
var staffingSheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().insertSheet("Staffing");

When I change the order of the first three lines I get errors on different lines and different calls but they are all TypeError: Cannot read property "0.0" from undefined. Oddly enough, when the staffingSheet already exists, no errors are thrown by the first three lines but an error is caused by the existance of the sheet its trying to create. Anyone have any ideas?

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I found the problem: Google Apps Script was pointing me to line 5. The issue was in another function in another document but because I had this script open it told me it was in this script instead. –  jrbalsano Mar 4 '12 at 21:02
    
Can you mark this question as answered? Can you put your answer and mark it? –  Alejandro Silvestri Mar 13 '12 at 11:13
    
I wasn't sure what the proper protocol is. There was nothing wrong with the code above, the problem was that the debugger was reporting errors on the correct line in the current file instead of the correct line in the correct file. Preferably, I would delete the question, but I'm not sure what to do here? –  jrbalsano Mar 13 '12 at 22:06

1 Answer 1

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Redian resolved it. There were no errors, the problem was in other code section.

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