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I have searched quite a bit on google but can't seem to find any clear answer. Under normal circumstances, a training set of size M x N will be of the form (X (i), Y (i)), 1 <= i <= M, where X(i) represents a particular row of data with N input features (or dimensions). However, suppose I have X(i) in the form of N x L (a 2d table). Hence, X has dimensions M x N x L (element of R^(MxNxL)). How should I approach this? (I hope I'm making sense here)

Currently, I'm attempting to take the N values in each of the N x L (table form) datas in X(i) and trying to map it to some set of unique numbers that represents the N values (standard deviation, mean or etc). This changes the size of X from M x N x L to M x L (or M x 2L) dimensions and allows me to classify accordingly. Currently, I'm using a NN implementation (will be looking into SVMS in the upcoming weeks).

Any suggestions to this particular issue (each training data in 2D table-format) to improve my learning algorithm will be greatly appreciated.

Edit: Let me be more specific to my data. Suppose I have 15 fields (L) and 200 (N) different readings of those fields at different times (or distance). For example, consider a problem where a person walks through a detector with 15 different sensors for 200 seconds. Hence, each row of data in N x L table corresponds to the data taken at each second. Hence, often times, there is a bell curve for N values at any given field, with increasing time. Moreover, each row(in NxL) is conditionally dependent. The classification is done on the person.

If someone can describe to me a psudo-algorithm in words (not just the names) to approach this issue, that would be fantastic.

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It is a little hard to answer without knowing some of the specifics of the sizes involved. Would it be prohibitive to flatten your N x L arrays into a long N' array? I use this approach for learning on image data, for example, which can give sufficient performance as long as your machine has sufficient resources and the images are small enough (say, 50 by 50 px should do just fine even on a naive implementation).

You could also look into doing some dimensionality reduction (e.g. principal component analysis) on your data. If your NN is still classifying well even after compressing your 2d features into 1d (standard deviations, as you mentioned), it sounds like you may have some redundancy in your features.

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Cameron is right. Usually it is not relevant if the input of a normal ANN is 1D, 2D or nD. You just have to flatten your 2D data, e. g. in row-major order. Thus you will have M inputs of dimension N*L. However, if your input matrices are images, you will maybe be interested in convolutional neural networks: yann.lecun.com/exdb/lenet, deeplearning.net/tutorial/lenet.html. – alfa Mar 4 '12 at 13:38
    
Thank you. I understand that a 50 x 50 -> 2500 (unique) features. I believe my case is different. Let me be more specific to my data. Suppose I have 15 fields (L) and 200 (N) different readings of those fields at different times (or distance). For example, consider a problem where a person walks through a detector with 15 different sensors for 200 seconds. Hence, each row of data in N x L table corresponds to the data taken at each second. Hence, often times, there is a bell curve for N values at any given field, with increasing time. Moreover, each row(in NxL) is conditionally dependent. – cynical biscuit Mar 4 '12 at 16:36
    
Of course, you could sum up the measurements of each sensor, but you will maybe lose information. Let the neural network do this for you. Otherwise you can apply feature extraction or dimensionality reduction methods, apply a filter and downsampling, 2D fourier transform (delete high frequency components)... There are numerous ways to solve this problem. It does not make any difference in which order you give the signal to an ANN. But you could maybe consider using recurrent neural networks or convolutional neural networks. – alfa Mar 4 '12 at 18:10
    
What do you mean by "let the neural network do this for you?" Thank you for those suggestions, by the way. Would you know where I can find a formal guide that shows the implementation of feature extraction, 2D fourier transform? Either way, it seems that regardless of what I do to solve the problem, I need to "flaten" out my 2D input data. Am I understanding it correctly? – cynical biscuit Mar 4 '12 at 20:11
    
The first layer does nothing else than summing the input up (with weights) and transform the sum with an activation function. – alfa Mar 5 '12 at 12:48

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