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I'm trying to crawl FTP and pull down all the files recursively.

Up until now I was trying to pull down a directory with

   ftp.list.each do |entry|
    if entry.split(/\s+/)[0][0, 1] == "d"
      out[:dirs] << entry.split.last unless black_dirs.include? entry.split.last
    else
      out[:files] << entry.split.last unless black_files.include? entry.split.last
    end

But turns out, if you split the list up until last space, filenames and directories with spaces are fetched wrong. Need a little help on the logic here.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can also use a regular expression. I put one together. Please verify if it works for you as well as I don't know it your dir listing look different. You have to use Ruby 1.9 btw.

reg = /^(?<type>.{1})(?<mode>\S+)\s+(?<number>\d+)\s+(?<owner>\S+)\s+(?<group>\S+)\s+(?<size>\d+)\s+(?<mod_time>.{12})\s+(?<path>.+)$/

match = entry.match(reg)

You are able to access the elements by name then

match[:type] contains a 'd' if it's a directory, a space if it's a file.

All the other elements are there as well. Most importantly match[:path].

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You could also use entry[1..-1].split[5][13..-1] to get the path and entry[0] to get the type –  Niklas B. Mar 4 '12 at 12:18
    
Does this regular expression work for all cases? There are huge variety of FTP servers around. We have clients who use some obscure proprietary, windows-based servers and the file listing returned by them look completely different from Linux versions. So what I ended up doing is for each file/directory entry I try CD into it and if this doesn't work - consider it a file :) Works like a charm. –  Alex Kovshovik Apr 10 '12 at 16:24

Assuming that the FTP server returns Unix-like file listings, the following code works. At least for me.

regex = /^d[r|w|x|-]+\s+[0-9]\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+\d+\s+\w+\s+\d+\s+[\d|:]+\s(.+)/
ftp.ls.each do |line|
    if dir = line.match(regex)
        puts dir[1]
    end
end

dir[1] contains the name of the directory (given that the inspected line actually represents a directory).

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There are a huge variety of FTP servers around.

We have clients who use some obscure proprietary, Windows-based servers and the file listing returned by them look completely different from Linux versions.

So what I ended up doing is for each file/directory entry I try changing directory into it and if this doesn't work - consider it a file :)

The following method is "bullet proof":

# Checks if the give file_name is actually a file.
def is_ftp_file?(ftp, file_name)
  ftp.chdir(file_name)
  ftp.chdir('..')
  false
rescue
  true
end

file_names = ftp.nlst.select {|fname| is_ftp_file?(ftp, fname)}

Works like a charm, but please note: if the FTP directory has tons of files in it - this method takes a while to traverse all of them.

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You can avoid recursion if you list all files at once

files = ftp.nlst('**/*.*')

Directories are not included in the list but the full ftp path is still available in the name.

EDIT

I'm assuming that each file name contains a dot and directory names don't. Thanks for mentioning @Niklas B.

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Trying to implement his in a deeper recursion right now, thanks. –  Norris Mar 4 '12 at 10:33
1  
I think this makes at least the assumption that every file has a dot in it. I'm not sure whether it makes the second assumption that directories don't have dots in them. Either way, I think the text should at least mention that fact. –  Niklas B. Mar 4 '12 at 11:57

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