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How should I create this kind of structure? My first idea was to combine four pinks to one one orange so I get 4pinksVS1orange (now the next puzzle is to place them side-by-side which I do not know, ok I know some hxcks but they get broken easily). Then after that the puzzle is the bottom row with four pinks (again the same side-by-side -puzzle). Suppose border:0 for clarity. I do not want any float -hxck, perhaps position: absolute -- sorry I do not know for sure. Below you can find the way how I would try to solve the case but I am sure someone can come up with more clever ideas.

CSS

<!--vim: nowrap:-->
<style type="css">
#body{
        width:800px;
        border:0;
}
#yellow{
        width:400px;
}
<!--ERR: poor reuse? How better?-->
#pinkFour{
        width:400px;
        height:400px;
}
#pinkOne{
        width:100px;
        height:100px;
}
/* ERR: poor reuse? How's better? */
#concatenatePinkYellow{         
        width:800px;
        height:400px;
}
#pinkRow{
        width:800px;
        height:100px;
}
</style>

Body

<body>
        <div id="concatenatePinkYellow"> 
                <div id="pinkFour"> </div> 
                <!-- HORIZONTAL-VERTICAL SBS -->
                <div id="yellow"> </div>
        </div>
        <div id="pinkRow">
                <!--TODO: four pinks here-->
                <!--HORIZONTAL SBS-->
                <!--TODO: how to place them side-by-side?-->
        </div>
</body>

Goal: REUSE!

The example had layout

4x4{1x1}4x4{4x4};8x1{1x1}

now suppose I want a layout with orange box in the middle and pink boxes in the surrounding, how? With the latter -syntax, it is just:

8x8{1x1};2x1{1x1}2x2{2x2}2x1{1x1};8x8{1x1}

...it cannot be harder than that? Is there any tool to fast generate different geometries with syntax like above? For simplicity, do not care about the content in the box.

share|improve this question
    
The answer is obviously CSS3 Grid Layout but it'll only render properly on one browser, IE10 (beta, W8 only, marketshare 0.02%) :) –  FelipeAls Mar 4 '12 at 10:19
    
Could you describe the content that'll go in those colored box? Is it 9 times the same type of content with one bigger than the others? In my experience there's no such thing as height, even for images (they can be replaced by @alt and it has variable length); that's why floats "explode" when 1 box is 1px taller for one reason or another... so what content? Should it be coded by lists, lists of lists if possible, plain images with no worry for containers? –  FelipeAls Mar 4 '12 at 10:25
    
@FelipeAlsacreations: do not worry about the content, my worry is the reuse. Suppose I need to change the layout a bit or that I want to auto-generate the layout for every day a bit differently. The boxes are the same size every day (or one can do small size changes if really needed). There must be some tool to provide high-level functionality as covered at the end, ideas whether the preview paper is about this? –  hhh Mar 4 '12 at 10:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Check this. No hacks. Pure CSS. http://jsfiddle.net/blackpla9ue/9gUP8/

HTML

<ul>
    <li class="yellow"></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
</ul>

CSS

ul{
    width: 240px;
    padding: 5px;
}

li{
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  display: block;
  background: pink;
  float: left;  
  margin: 5px;
}

li.yellow{
  width: 110px;
  height: 110px;
  background: yellow;
  float: right;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I did not know you can use ul|li like that, to replace divs? Any idea whether it is possible leave out the margins and somehow in the high-level to state that every box must be in 5px\pm10px -proximity to other box? When I trialed that, I messed up with the monotonous calculations -- would be cool to somehow make them like proximity: 5\pm10px; for example in the body. –  hhh Mar 4 '12 at 10:51
    
you mean to keep only a 5px gap between each box is it? –  blackpla9ue Mar 4 '12 at 11:04
    
By proximity, I mean approximately about 5px\pm10px. I am not worried whether it is really 0-15px, something like that is fine -- would make things simpler and probably more reusable in different context. –  hhh Mar 4 '12 at 11:30
    
+1 but you guys are doing well, thanks for your answers. I will research this further on my own perhaps to clarify this question with more exact example next time. –  hhh Mar 4 '12 at 11:42
    
glad this was of some help to you mate :) let me know if thers anythin more –  blackpla9ue Mar 4 '12 at 11:46

Just split your template in 'left' and 'right' :

jsbin demo

  #container{
    border:1px dashed #444;
    width:480px;
    height:360px;   
  }

  .left{
    width:240px;
    float:left;
  }
  .right{
    width:240px;
    float:left;
  }
  .pink{
    background:#FF2780;
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    float:left;
    margin:10px;
  }

  .yellow{
    width:220px;
    height:220px;
    background:#FFC000;
    float:left;
    margin:10px;
  }

.

<div id="container">

  <div class="left">
    <div class="pink"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>  
 </div>

 <div class="right">
    <div class="yellow"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>
    <div class="pink"></div>
  </div>

</div>
share|improve this answer
    
...I always mess up with the borders and paddings (they are just some linear relationship to other dims), is there some generic tool to say that every box must hover 10px or 1%-of-XYZ from each other or in some proximity? Instead of hard-coding, it would be very useful to find some generic way of putting many-small-boxes and then one big box on the site. –  hhh Mar 4 '12 at 10:43

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