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I have a factory returning types of IShape. The factory builds concrete classes like Circle, Square etc as below.

public class ShapeFactory
{
    public IShape GetShape(Shape shape, string name)
    {
        IShape s = null;

        switch (shape)
        {
            case Shape.Square: s = new Square(name);
                break;
            case Shape.Triangle: s = new Triagle(name);
                break;
            case Shape.Circle: s = new Circle(name);
                break;
        }

        return s;
    }
}

The user can edit any of the IShapes but each concrete class requires a different dialog to edit the various properties. What is the best way of detecting the typeof Shape? Currently i have an void Edit(IShape shape) method that performs a series of if checks

public static void Edit(IShape shape)
{
    if (shape == Square)
        new EditSquare(shape as Square).ShowDialog();
    else if (shape == Triangle)
        new EditTriangle(shape as Triangle).ShowDialog(); 
}

Is this a reasonable approach? What is the best way to go about this.

Edit: Each concrete class derives from an abstract Shape class defining some base properties

public abstract class Shape
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Rect Boundary { get; }
    public double Area { get; protected set; }
}

IShape exposes some functions that the user would like to perform

public interface IShape
{
    void Translate(Vector v);
    void Calculate();
}

Thanks

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Can you show us the IShape interface? And your concrete class (Square, Circle, etc) derive from a base class (Shape).? –  Steve Mar 4 '12 at 10:14
    
You should post this in code review. –  Lloyd Mar 4 '12 at 10:15
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's typically a sign of a bad design if you need to switch behavior explicitly based on the type of the object. Whenever you add a shape, you'd have to update all places where you do those type based switches.

Your main "weapons" in those cases are polymorphism and virtual functions.

In the easiest approach you could have a method on IShape that creates the editor on its own:

public interface IShape {
    IShapeEditor CreateEditor();
}

public interface IShapeEditor {
    void ShowDialog();
}

public class Square : IShape {
    public IShapeEditor CreateEditor(){
        return new SquareEditor(this);
    }
}


public class Triangle: IShape {
    public IShapeEditor CreateEditor(){
        return new TriangleEditor(this);
    }
}


public class Circle: IShape {
    public IShapeEditor CreateEditor(){
        return new CircleEditor(this);
    }
}

In this case, your Edit method could look like:

public static void Edit(IShape shape)
{
    shape.CreateEditor().ShowDialog();
}

An issue with this approach is that you maybe don't want to have the shape know about an editor. A pattern that tries to solve this issue is the visitor pattern.

Using a visitor pattern could go like this:

public interface IShapeVisitor {
    void VisitSquare(Square s);
    void VisitTriangle(Triangle t);
    void VisitCircle(Circle c);
}


public interface IShape {
    void Accept(IShapeVisitor visitor);
}

public class Square : IShape {
    public void Accept(IShapeVisitor visitor){
        visitor.VisitSquare(this);
    }
}


public class Triangle: IShape {
    public void Accept(IShapeVisitor visitor){
        visitor.VisitTriangle(this);
    }
}


public class Circle: IShape {
    public void Accept(IShapeVisitor visitor){
        visitor.VisitCircle(this);
    }
}

This is the basic structure. For the editor you'd know create a visitor like this:

public class EditorCreationVisitor : IShapeVisitor{
    IShapeEditor editor;

    public void VisitSquare(Square s ){
        editor = new SquareEditor(s);
    }


    public void VisitTriangle(Triangle t ){
        editor = new TriangleEditor(t);
    }

    public void VisitCircle(Circle c ){
        editor = new CircleEditor(c);
    }


    public IShapeEditor Editor {get{return editor;}}
}

Your Edit method would then go like this:

public static void Edit(IShape shape)
{
    var visitor = new EditorCreationVisitor();
    shape.Accept(visitor);
    var editor = visitor.Editor;
    editor.ShowDialog();
}

The visitor pattern works best if the number of different shape type is fairly constant, but you add different behavior regularly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that Andre. As you said i wanted to avoid the objects 'knowing' about the editor so the visitor pattern looks like just the ticket. –  Cadair Idris Mar 4 '12 at 10:33
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In general you should avoid switch on type as these will become a maintenance problem when you add new shape classes. Instead, add virtual method GetEditor() in your IShape interface. Your code then becomes:

public static void Edit(IShape shape) 
{ 
  shape.GetEditor().ShowDialog(); 
} 

The concrete shape classes override GetEditor() to return the shape specific editor subclass.

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Why don't you create a BaseShape abstract class and derive your concrete class from BaseShape?. In BaseShape you have the abstract method Edit() so your derived class implements the corrent behavior. There is no need to have a public static void Edit(IShape shape). Call your shape.Edit() wherever you need it.

share|improve this answer
    
My shapes are in a library dll that dosen't have access to the UI dialogs. I was trying to keep the shapes and UI separate, is it acceptable for business objects to provide their own UI components. It certainly makes it easier –  Cadair Idris Mar 4 '12 at 10:38
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