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i've some public variables in my class, here is how i define them

class MyClass
{
   public $var1;
   public $var2;
   public $var3;

   function __construct($params)
   {
     if(isset($params['var1']))
     $this->var1 = $params['var1'];

     if(isset($params['var2']))
     $this->var3 = $params['var2'];

     if(isset($params['var3']))
     $this->var3 = $params['var3'];

   }
}

but as i said theese are optional parameters. Some object's will use it, some wont use it. My question is i'm defining it everytime even it's used or not. Should i define it when it's passed something like:

     if(isset($params['var1']))
     public $var1 = $params['var1'];

i'm quite newbie with php, just need to know what i'm doing at top is right?

edit:typo.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can create an array instead and store only those values that are submitted like this:

class MyClass
{
   public $data = array();

   function __construct($params)
   {
     if(isset($params['var1']))
        $this->data['var1'] = $params['var1'];

     if(isset($params['var2']))
        $this->data['var2'] = $params['var2'];

     if(isset($params['var3']))
        $this->data['var3'] = $params['var3'];

   }
}

This way you have a single concrete known variable you can refer to anytime to get needed data back.

share|improve this answer
    
Is this array for only optional parameters? –  Malixxl Mar 4 '12 at 10:19
    
Aight, last question, i want to optimize variable count cause if a variable isn't used but definied may be unnecessary memory use or work for server,. So i want to use this way to optimize my codes, but in Php is it required? –  Malixxl Mar 4 '12 at 10:23
    
@Malixxl: With the code above, any variable which was not set won't be stored saving your memory. –  Sarfraz Mar 4 '12 at 10:27
1  
I think this is a bad solution personally. For a start most IDEs will have trouble auto-suggesting from this. Also it's close to being a magic solution. What happens for example if someone mis-types one of the array elements? You can an obscure bug that's very hard to track down. It also makes the code harder to document and hard to use. –  liquorvicar Mar 4 '12 at 10:41
1  
See my comment on another answer. There are specific practical issues here (like mis-typing, why not use all the tools at your disposal to make your life easier) but this is basically a code smell. You need to ask why you have optional properties and whether they shouldn't be in another object. Using arrays like this is hard to document and hence hard to use. –  liquorvicar Mar 4 '12 at 10:51

The variables are optional for objects..but are properties of the class..

For some objects if the variables can be set means they are attributes of a class, means they should be there in class defination, I might be wrong but as per code design I have learned objects don't decide what to be inserted in class, class decide..

You can have inheritence, if you want to be precise you can have inheritence, include all required paramaters in base class and based in optional parameters design child classes..

As a matter of good code design I wont ever go with defining attributes on requirement.

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So you mean create child classes instead of this when theese parameters required. Main class containts only default variables? –  Malixxl Mar 4 '12 at 10:28
    
Yeah..for objects which require extra attributes then common ones they should be object of a child class of the common class..Think it as a code design.. –  Rajat Singhal Mar 4 '12 at 10:31
    
Thanks for explanation. I'got my answer top but upvote for good explanation. As a newbie i got your point. –  Malixxl Mar 4 '12 at 10:34
2  
@Malixxl This is the best solution. The very fact you are in this situation is a code smell. You need to think about what these optional parameters are and why they are not used in all objects. Maybe you need to break them out in some other kind of objects (and think twice before you use inheritance, it's one of the most over-used and abused OO patterns in PHP). –  liquorvicar Mar 4 '12 at 10:43

You can add the public field dynamically, don't need to define them first.

class MyClass
{
   function __construct($params)
   {
     if(isset($params['var1']))
     $this->var1 = $params['var1'];

     if(isset($params['var2']))
     $this->var1 = $params['var2'];

     if(isset($params['var3']))
     $this->var1 = $params['var3'];

   }
}

Or you can use the magic method __set

class MyClass {
    protected static $allowed_fields = array('var1', 'var2', 'var3');

    public function __construct($params) {
        foreach ($params as $key => $value) {
            if (in_array($key, self::$allowed_fields)) {
                $this->$key = $value;
            }
        }
    }

    public function __set($key, $value) {
            if (in_array($key, self::$allowed_fields)) {
                $this->$key = $value;
            } else {
                 throw new Exception("You can't set the field $key");
            }
    }

}
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1  
so this will create a var1,var2,var3 variable when only it is passed? –  Malixxl Mar 4 '12 at 10:20
    
@Malixxl Yes, that's right. –  xdazz Mar 4 '12 at 10:28

It's not right. When clients will work with your class, all they'll know is the class name and its interface. They won't go to the code to see what parameters are needed. Better approach is:

class MyClass
{
   private $var1;
   private $var2;
   private $var3;

   function __construct($var1 = null, $var2 = null, $var3 = null)
   {
     $this->var1 = $var1;
     $this->var3 = $var2;
     $this->var3 = $var3;

   }
}
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Take a look at magic __set and __get methods. http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.overloading.php

You can just store the property values in an array, and server/write them with __get and __set.

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I dont like the whole concept. Since you are defining a public variable, what is the entire point. Unless you are blocking this, we can easily initialize a public variable outside the class, like:

$obj = new classname();

$obj -> unknowpublicname = "somevaue";

Whatever you do, unless you restrict some rules, or change the access modifiers, it does not make any difference.

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