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I need to delete all the rows in a datatable (ADO.net). I dont want to use Foreach here.

In one single how can I delete all the rows.

Then I need to update the datatable to database.

Note: I have tried dataset.tables[0].rows.clear and dataset.clear but both are not working

Also I dont want to use sql delete query.

Post other than this if you able to provide answer.

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Clear should work, so maybe you have an exception when you try (orphan child relations) –  inspite Jun 5 '09 at 11:32
1  
Can we see all your code please? –  inspite Jun 5 '09 at 11:32
1  
Clear removes the rows, it doesn't delete them. I think looping over them and deleting them one by one is the only option. –  Matt Hamilton Jun 5 '09 at 11:33
    
According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… "All rows in all tables are removed. An exception is generated if the table has any enforced child relations that would cause child rows to be orphaned." –  inspite Jun 5 '09 at 11:35
5  
There's a difference between removing rows from a DataTable and deleting them. Deleting flags them as deleted so that when you apply changes to your database, the actual db rows are deleted. Removing them (with Clear()) just takes them out of the in-memory DataTable. –  Matt Hamilton Jun 5 '09 at 11:38
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5 Answers 5

'foreach' isn't such a simple answer to this question either -- you run into the problem where the enumerator is no longer valid for a changed collection.

The hassle here is that the Delete() behavior is different for a row in DataRowState.Added vs. Unchanged or Modified. If you Delete() an added row, it does just remove it from the collection since the data store presumably never knew about it anyway. Delete() on an unchanged or modified row simply marks it as deleted as others have indicated.

So I've ended up implementing an extension method like this to handle deleting all rows. If anyone has any better solutions, that would be great.

    public static void DeleteAllRows(this DataTable table)
    {
        int idx = 0;
        while (idx < table.Rows.Count)
        {
            int curCount = table.Rows.Count;
            table.Rows[idx].Delete();
            if (curCount == table.Rows.Count) idx++;
        }
    }
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I'll just repost my comment here in case you want to close off this question, because I don't believe it's possible to "bulk delete" all the rows in a DataTable:

There's a difference between removing rows from a DataTable and deleting them. Deleting flags them as deleted so that when you apply changes to your database, the actual db rows are deleted. Removing them (with Clear()) just takes them out of the in-memory DataTable.

You'll have to iterate over the rows and delete them one by one. It's only a couple of lines of code.

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this works.

            for (int i = dtParts.Rows.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
                dtParts.Rows[i].Delete();
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this works with lambda expression:
But here you have to use FOREACH of Lambda.
Luckily you have single line here to delete your stuff from datatable :)

myTable.AsEnumerable().ToList().ForEach(m => m.Delete());
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DataTable=Datatable.Clone;

That should do it. This will copy the table structure, but not the data. (Datatable.Copy would do that)

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Anybody coming across this post should be very careful of this answer. This is no different from DataTable.Clear() in that it doesn't track the delete, it just removes the row from the table. –  Clyde Jan 18 '10 at 21:10
    
It still answers the question, though. –  Hooloovoo Feb 8 '10 at 20:14
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