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I have a base controller class:

And all my other controller inherits this BaseClass like this

All this works great in MVC3 (test again today, it really works) but it seems that the ExecuteCore in BaseController is not fired any more in MVC 4 beta.

Any idea? Or Anything huge has changed under the hood? Thanks very much.

public class BaseController : Controller
{
    private string _myData;

    public string MyData
    {
        get
        {
            return _myData;
        }
    }

    protected override void ExecuteCore()
    {
        _myData = "I am doing something";

        base.ExecuteCore();
    }
}


public class HomeController : BaseController
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewBag.MyData = MyData;
        // Doing something with value in BaseClass

        return View();
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I was able to reproduce your problem. It seems that the usage of ExecuteCore is changed. But I haven't find any information about it. My guess it's related to the fact that now the Controller implements IAsyncController not the AsyncController.

However I've found a workaround (solution?) to get the old behavior with MVC4.

Add this to the BaseContoller :

protected override bool DisableAsyncSupport
{
    get { return true; }
}

The MSDN page for DisableAsyncSupport is basically empty and Google is also clueless about what it does, so be careful with the above solution.

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5  
Thanks for the comment. It seems that MVC team really changed something. I have another walkaround which may solve this: Instead of the ExecuteCore, I override the OnActionExecuting in the BaseClass, which get fired correctly. –  BladeLeaf Mar 5 '12 at 1:48
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I voted nemesv answer because it gave me an explanation about what is going on. I have MVC3 and MVC4 projects and this this was driving me mad.

However I have another solution. Override Initialize method in the Controller class:

public abstract class BaseController : Controller
{
  protected override void Initialize(System.Web.Routing.RequestContext requestContext)
  {
     string languageId = "en";
     try{
       // all your code here. You have access to all the context information, 
       // like querystring values:
       string languageId = requestContext.HttpContext.Request.QueryString["lang"];
       Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = 
          CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture(languageId);
     }
     finally
     {
       Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = 
         CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture(languageId);
     }

     base.Initialize(requestContext);
  }
}

Then in your project just make your controllers inherit from BaseController and that is all, BaseController call works automatically passing the request context. It works for both MVC3 and MVC4.

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Does this also works for custom model binders? Are the thread cultures correctly set when a model binder is invoked? –  Rookian Dec 10 '13 at 16:25
    
Your solution is a great approach Alphonzo. It is exactly the right alternative to ExecuteCore() and works with MVC5. Here's the MSDN documentation for the Controller.Initialize Method: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  GDB Dec 19 '13 at 2:27
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You can also use BeginExecuteCore

protected override IAsyncResult BeginExecuteCore(AsyncCallback callback, object state)
        {
            return base.BeginExecuteCore(callback, state);
        }
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