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I'm getting some strange whitespace between two divs I have.

Each div has the css property display: inline-block and each have a set height and width.

I cannot find where the whitespace is.

Here is a Fiddle

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Thank you, guys. – Тарас Лукавий Mar 4 '12 at 13:37
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You get whitespace there because you have whitespace inbetween the divs. Whitespace between inline elements is interpreted as a space.

You have:

<div id="left_side">
    <div id="plan">
        <h1>div 1</h1>
    </div>
</div>
<div id="right_side">
    <div id="news">
        <h1>div 2</h1>
    </div>
</div>

Change for:

<div id="left_side">
    <div id="plan">
        <h1>div 1</h1>
    </div>
</div><div id="right_side">
    <div id="news">
        <h1>div 2</h1>
    </div>
</div>

However, this is a bad way to do what you want to do.

You should float the elements if thats what you want to do.

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Would downvoter like to explain? – Thomas Clayson Mar 4 '12 at 13:35
    
Don't worry, I'm restoring the balance for you. :) – AlexKempton Mar 4 '12 at 17:01
13  
what's wrong with % width/heights? – Pup Apr 10 '13 at 3:17
    
Nowadays %widths and height are preferred for your website to work perfectly on all devices. – Ali Mohyudin Jul 11 '15 at 1:41
1  
Edited. My comment (made almost 4 years ago) was made at a time when "liquid layout" was a poor design choice. Nowadays % width/height works well for responsive web design. – Thomas Clayson Jul 13 '15 at 15:52

Use:

float:left;
clear:none;  

In both div

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This does the trick:

<div id="left_side">
    ...
</div><div id="right_side">
    ...
</div>

Notice how the right-side div starts immediately after the closing tag of the left-side div. This works because any space between the elements, since they are now inline, would become a space in the layout itself. You can mirror this behavior with two span elements.

Demo.

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If you want to retain your coding layout, avoid floats and keep each div on it's own line entirely...

<div id="leftSide">Some content here</div><!-- --><div id="rightSide">Some more content here</div>

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Floated both of the elements left, also made the 30% width into 40% to fill all the space, but this isn't necessary. Please be aware, "inline-block" isn't supported by IE7 but can be fixed with a workaround.

http://jsfiddle.net/RVAQp/3/

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This, of course, is another option. Though it should be noted the floated elements should be cleared. – Purag Mar 4 '12 at 13:32
    
Good points, but really doesn't answer the OP's question. This is really a comment that should go on the question, rather than an answer. – Thomas Clayson Mar 4 '12 at 13:34
    
You're completely right, I sort of missed the point with this one. – AlexKempton Mar 4 '12 at 17:03

Move these statements onto the same line:

</div><div id="right_side">
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Only add this to your CSS

h1 {
    padding:0;
    margin:0;
   }

Space between div is only due to h1 Margin and Padding

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Tried using float instead of "inline-block", no problems. Just changed the display:inline-block to:

#left_side {float: left;}

and

#right_side {float: right; margin-right: 10%}

No apparent problems. Could be wrong.

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1  
Floats and inline-blocks (as well as table-cells and flexible boxes) are fundamentally different things. All four techniques may be suitable for horizontal alignment of items, but they have different limitations and downsides. In theory, flexboxes seem to be the most universal way of the four, but browsers support of the latest spec version is still rather limited. – Ilya Streltsyn Jul 24 '13 at 5:23

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