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If I have an array full of information, is there any way I can a default for values to be returned if the key doesn't exist?

function items() {
    return array(
        'one' => array(
              'a' => 1,
              'b' => 2,
              'c' => 3,
              'd' => 4,
         ),
         'two' => array(
              'a' => 1,
              'b' => 2,
              'c' => 3,
              'd' => 4,
         ),
         'three' => array(
              'a' => 1,
              'b' => 2,
              'c' => 3,
              'd' => 4,
         ),
    );
}

And in my code

$items = items();
echo $items['one']['a']; // 1

But can I have a default value to be returned if I give a key that doesn't exist like,

$items = items();
echo $items['four']['a']; // DOESN'T EXIST RETURN DEFAULT OF 99

Thanks ?

share|improve this question
1  
php.net/array_key_exists. The manual can be quite useful. –  vascowhite Mar 4 '12 at 14:45
1  
Although array_key_exists would work, it may lead to performance issues with big arrays or lots of checks. It iterates over the entire array to make sure that key exists. Alternatively, isset() does one check and moves on. –  CaseySoftware Mar 4 '12 at 14:56
1  
What php needs is an array coalescing funcion, something that checks presence and gets the value or a default value if empty. –  Jens Mar 8 '13 at 16:49

6 Answers 6

I know this is an old question, but my Google search for "php array default values" took me here, and I thought I would post the solution I was looking for, chances are it might help someone else.

I wanted an array with default option values that could be overridden by custom values. I ended up using array_merge.

Example:

<?php
    $defaultOptions = array("color" => "red", "size" => 5, "text" => "Default text");
    $customOptions = array("color" => "blue", "text" => "Custom text");
    $options = array_merge($defaultOptions, $customOptions);
    print_r($options);
?>

Outputs:

Array
(
    [color] => blue
    [size] => 5
    [text] => Custom text
)
share|improve this answer

This should do the trick:

$value =  isset($items['four']['a']) ? $items['four']['a'] : 99;

A helper function would be useful, if you have to write these a lot:

function arr_get($array, $key, $default = null){
    return isset($array[$key]) ? $array[$key] : $default;
}
share|improve this answer
22  
I can't believe it's 2013 and there is no native funcion for this. What's the point of typing a whole expression twice? –  Jens Mar 8 '13 at 16:47
    
Kohana has an Array helper, you can do this by calling Arr::get('key', $array, $default) really handy. –  Mārtiņš Briedis Mar 9 '13 at 21:27
13  
I wish I could downvote PHP itself for not having a nicer way to deal with this. –  Tyler Collier Apr 15 '14 at 0:27
2  
Yep, it's hard to believe that PHP doesn't have something like : $array->get($key, $default) –  fe_lix_ Jun 18 '14 at 7:15
    
I made another helper function which is simpler and needs fewer arguments: stackoverflow.com/a/25205195/1890285 –  Stephan J. Müller Aug 8 '14 at 13:59

Not that I know of.

You'd have to check separately with isset

echo isset($items['four']['a']) ? $items['four']['a'] : 99;
share|improve this answer

Use Array_Fill() function

http://php.net/manual/en/function.array-fill.php

$default = array(
              'a' => 1,
              'b' => 2,
              'c' => 3,
              'd' => 4,
         );
$arr = Array_Fill(1,3,$default);
print_r($arr);

This is the result:

Array
(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [a] => 1
            [b] => 2
            [c] => 3
            [d] => 4
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [a] => 1
            [b] => 2
            [c] => 3
            [d] => 4
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [a] => 1
            [b] => 2
            [c] => 3
            [d] => 4
        )

)
share|improve this answer

I don't know of a way to do it precisely with the code you provided, but you could work around it with a function that accepts any number of arguments and returns the parameter you're looking for or the default.

Usage:

echo arr_value($items, 'four', 'a');

or:

echo arr_value($items, 'four', 'a', '1', '5');

Function:

function arr_value($arr, $dimension1, $dimension2, ...)
{
    $default_value = 99;
    if (func_num_args() > 1)
    {
        $output = $arr;
        $args = func_gets_args();
        for($i = 1; $i < func_num_args(); $i++)
        {
            $outout = isset($output[$args[$i]]) ? $output[$args[$i]] : $default_value;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return $default_value;
    }

    return $output;
}
share|improve this answer

You could also do this:

$value =  $items['four']['a'] ?: 99;

This equates to:

$value =  $items['four']['a'] ? $items['four']['a'] : 99;

It saves the need to wrap the whole statement into a function!

share|improve this answer
    
Are you really sure that those both lines do the same? –  Mārtiņš Briedis Feb 28 '14 at 1:15
    
This wouldn't return the value $items['four']['a'], but instead would return TRUE. –  Weboide Apr 8 '14 at 12:59
    
You're right... sorry about that. If you take the isset function away, it would work. Editing now. –  Eric Keyte Apr 21 '14 at 19:00
1  
This would be checking the value of $items['four']['a'] not its existence. It is very different from checking with isset. –  fe_lix_ Jun 18 '14 at 7:17

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