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URLs are a user interface, but they are also used to implement the site technically. Compare the following two URLs:

http://example.com/2012/my-article-name/
http://example.com/static/jquery.js

The first is a permalink; part of the "API" if you like. The second is just an addressing mechanism that makes the site work. I might decide to change the second one if I upgrade my site's backend, but I want the first to remain constant for as long as the content at that location exists.

So what are the conventions for indicating that a URL is to be considered part of the site's private technical implementation, rather than part of the public user interface? I've used one above (the word "static"). Another might be an underscore like this:

http://example.com/_/jquery.js

I'm looking for advice, best practice, etc. on this concept.

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2 Answers 2

As far as I know, there is no standard convention for this. And even if there was, I wouldn't bother with it, because:

  1. Who is going to view http://example.com/static/jquery.js?
  2. JavaScript files and "files that make the site work", if you view them, don't display like regular webpages. Users can use that distinction that those files are part of the "technical implementation" of a site.
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Visible URL's may be considered part of the user's interface. Just a few years ago, they needed to be unique for every piece of content in the website, or SEO would suffer. Today most search engines support the rel=canonical tag, but still it's a good practice to keep them constant and as logical for the user as possible.

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