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I'm trying to replace my CDI/EJB annotations with Spring ones. But I'm struggeling how to do it right.

This is what I have in CDI/EJB:

@Stateless
@TransactionAttribute(TransactionAttributeType.REQUIRES_NEW)
class Service {
    @Inject
    EntityManager em;
}


@Named
@RequestScoped
class Facade {
    @Inject
    Service service;
}

Now I would do the following:

@Stateless
@Transactional
@Repository
class Service {
    @Inject
    EntityManager em;   
}

What about the stateless? What is the aquivalent in spring? Obvious I cannot just remove this annotation, bc then I'm getting these exception:

javax.el.PropertyNotFoundException: /input.xhtml @15,30 registerButtonAction="#{facade.createNew()}": The class 'Facade$Proxy$_$$_WeldClientProxy' does not have the property ...

Further:

@Named
@Service
class Facade {
    @Autowired
    Service service;
}

Do I have to simply replace all @Inject annotations with @Autowired? Is there something in Spring that takes care of EL naming, so that I can remove the @Named?

Do I have to annotate my JPA entities too?

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3  
Why would you want to do this? Not trying to start a flame war, just curious. –  NBW Mar 4 '12 at 20:54
    
bc spring annotations make things quite easy. eg aspects, can catch exceptions on all @Component annotated classes. –  membersound Mar 6 '12 at 16:37
1  
EE6 / EJb 3.1 / CDI also offers such aspect functionality with annotations, interceptors etc. For that case I don't see the value in the effort to switch but thats just me. –  NBW Mar 19 '12 at 22:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Stateless and Stateful Beans are EJB concepts, but Spring offers similar services through Service Beans. Put the @Service annotation in your Business Logic classes, and if you want your beans to be "Stateless" or "Stateful" just configure your bean scope (like Request or Session).

Spring also has a built-in transaction management API, so your Transaction annotations may need to be changed.

Finally, Spring is compatible with many persistence frameworks including JPA. IF you want to keep JPA is OK, and feel free to change it for another technology if you desire (maybe Hibernate, or MyBatis)

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The stateless and stateful concepts are EJB; Spring doesn't have such a notion. Spring uses POJOs, without any support for stateful beans. You're on your own there.

Spring uses javax.annotation.Resource annotation; I'd prefer that to @Autowired.

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Spring supports @Inject and @Named directly. No need to use @Autowired and @Component (Spring's equivalents) if you don't want to. No need to bring in @Resource either.

// This is a singleton by default, which is OK since you previously
// had it marked as stateless
@Named
@Transactional(propagation=Propagation.REQUIRES_NEW)
class Service {
    @PersistenceContext   // Use JPA's usual annotation
    EntityManager em;
}

// You may not still need this, but if you do ...
@Named
@Scope("request")
class Facade {
    @Inject
    Service service;
}
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