Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to shuffle only elements of a list on 3rd till last position so the 1st two will always stay in place e.g.

list = ['a?','b','c','d','e']

into

list = ['a?','b','d','e','c']

and for some reason this doesn't work:

list = ['a?','b','c','d','e']
import random
random.shuffle(list[2:])    
print list

Any know what am I doing wrong??

The only thing that works for me is so far this (EDITED):

lists = [['a?','b','c','d','e'],['1?','2','3','4','5','6','7']]
import random

for list in lists:
    copy = list[2:]
    random.shuffle(copy)
    list[2:] = copy

print lists

Think this is exactly what I needed.

share|improve this question
3  
list[2:] creates a new list which is not referenced anywhere else, so the result is just lost. – Felix Kling Mar 4 '12 at 17:34
    
@FelixKling: Post it as an answer, with a small code sample how it should be fixed [how to assign] – amit Mar 4 '12 at 17:35
    
lst[2:] = random.sample(lst[2:], len(lst[2:])) or see function version below. – dansalmo Aug 17 '14 at 17:58

What you do is this:

copy = list[2:]
random.shuffle(copy)    

which does not do much to the original list. Try this:

copy = list[2:]
random.shuffle(copy)
list[2:] = copy # overwrite the original
share|improve this answer
    
The disadvantage is that this will bring in two copies, which can be expensive for large lists. – orlp Mar 4 '12 at 17:36
    
yeah that kinda similar to what i just posted.. the think is ill be needed to this with list that contains multiple lists.. like [[],[],[],[],[]] – user1227065 Mar 4 '12 at 17:39

If you want to shuffle without copying, you may try to write your own mutable slice class, like follows (that's a rough implementation sketch, no boundary checks etc):

class MutableSlice(object):
    def __init__(self, baselist, begin, end=None):
        self._base = baselist
        self._begin = begin
        self._end = len(baselist) if end is None else end

    def __len__(self):
        return self._end - self._begin

    def __getitem__(self, i):
        return self._base[self._begin + i]

    def __setitem__(self, i, val):
        self._base[i + self._begin] = val

Then wrap the original list into it and feed to the standard shuffle:

>>> mylist = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
>>> slice = MutableSlice(mylist, 2)
>>> import random
>>> random.shuffle(slice)
>>> mylist
[1, 2, 4, 3, 5, 6]
share|improve this answer

You can create your own shuffle function that will allow you to shuffle a slice within a mutable sequence. It handles sampling the slice copy and reassigning back to the slice. You must pass slice() arguments instead of the more familiar [2:] notation.

from random import sample
def myShuffle(x, *s):
    x[slice(*s)] = sample(x[slice(*s)], len(x[slice(*s)]))

usage:

>>> lst = ['a?','b','c','d','e']   #don't use list as a name
>>> myShuffle(lst, 2)              #shuffles lst[:2]
>>> lst
['b', 'a?', 'c', 'd', 'e']
>>> myShuffle(lst, 2, None)        #shuffles lst[2:]
>>> lst
['b', 'a?', 'd', 'e', 'c']
share|improve this answer

l[2:] constructs a new list, and random.shuffle tries to change the list "in-place," which has no effect on l itself.

You could use random.sample for this:

l[2:] = random.sample(l[2:], len(l)-2)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice trick with sample, but in this case the sublist is first copied as well. – bereal Mar 4 '12 at 20:11
    
or myShuffle = lambda x: sample(x, len(x)), l[2:] = myShuffle(l[2:]) – dansalmo Dec 27 '13 at 18:16

Using the fact that a list has fast remove and insert and exteding a previous solution (http://stackoverflow.com/a/25229111/3449962):

List item

  • enumerate fixed elements and copy them and their index
  • delete fixed elements from list
  • shuffle remaining sub-set
  • put fixed elements back in

This will use in-place operations with memory overhead that depends on the number of fixed elements in the list. Linear in time. A possible more general implementation of shuffle_subset:

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""Shuffle elements in a list, except for a sub-set of the elments.

The sub-set are those elements that should retain their position in
the list.  Some example usage:

>>> from collections import namedtuple
>>> class CAnswer(namedtuple("CAnswer","x fixed")):
...             def __bool__(self):
...                     return self.fixed is True
...             __nonzero__ = __bool__  # For Python 2. Called by bool in Py2.
...             def __repr__(self):
...                     return "<CA: {}>".format(self.x)
...
>>> val = [3, 2, 0, 1, 5, 9, 4]
>>> fix = [2, 5]
>>> lst = [CAnswer(v, i in fix) for i, v in enumerate(val)]

>>> print("Start   ", 0, ": ", lst)
Start    0 :  [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>, <CA: 0>, <CA: 1>, <CA: 5>, <CA: 9>, <CA: 4>]

Using a predicate to filter.

>>> for i in range(4):  # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
...     shuffle_subset(lst, lambda x : x.fixed)
...     print([lst[i] for i in fix], end=" ")
...
[<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>] [<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>] [<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>] [<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>]

>>> for i in range(4):                # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
...     shuffle_subset(lst)           # predicate = bool()
...     print([lst[i] for i in fix], end=" ")
...
[<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>] [<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>] [<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>] [<CA: 0>, <CA: 9>]

Exclude certain postions from the shuffle.  For example, exclude the
first two elements:

>>> fix = [0, 1]
>>> lst = [CAnswer(v, i in fix) for i, v in enumerate(val)]
>>> print("Start   ", 0, ": ", lst)
Start    0 :  [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>, <CA: 0>, <CA: 1>, <CA: 5>, <CA: 9>, <CA: 4>]
>>> for i in range(4):                # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
...     shuffle_subset(lst, fix)
...     print([lst[i] for i in fix], end=" ")
...
[<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>]

Using a selector with the same number of elements as lst:

>>> fix = [0, 1]
>>> lst = [CAnswer(v, i in fix) for i, v in enumerate(val)]
>>> sel = [(i in fix) for i, _ in enumerate(val)]
>>> print("Start   ", 0, ": ", lst)
Start    0 :  [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>, <CA: 0>, <CA: 1>, <CA: 5>, <CA: 9>, <CA: 4>]
>>> for i in range(4):                # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
...     shuffle_subset(lst, sel)
...     print([lst[i] for i in fix], end=" ")
...
[<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>]

A generator as selector works fine too:

>>> fix = [0, 1]
>>> lst = [CAnswer(v, i in fix) for i, v in enumerate(val)]
>>> print("Start   ", 0, ": ", lst)
Start    0 :  [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>, <CA: 0>, <CA: 1>, <CA: 5>, <CA: 9>, <CA: 4>]
>>> for i in range(4):                # doctest: +NORMALIZE_WHITESPACE
...     sel = ((i in fix) for i, _ in enumerate(val))
...     shuffle_subset(lst, sel)
...     print([lst[i] for i in fix], end=" ")
...
[<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>] [<CA: 3>, <CA: 2>]

"""
from __future__ import print_function
import random


def shuffle_subset(lst, predicate=None):
    """All elements in lst, except a sub-set, are shuffled.

    The predicate defines the sub-set of elements in lst that should
    not be shuffled:

      + The predicate is a callable that returns True for fixed
      elements, predicate(element) --> True or False.

      + If the predicate is None extract those elements where
      bool(element) == True.

      + The predicate is an iterable that is True for fixed elements
      or len(predicate) == len(lst).

      + The predicate is a list of indices of fixed elements in lst
      with len(predicate) < len(lst).

    """
    def extract_fixed_elements(pred, lst):
        try:
            if callable(pred) or pred is None:
                pred = bool if pred is None else pred
                fixed_subset = [(i, e) for i, e in enumerate(lst) if pred(e)]
            elif (hasattr(pred, '__next__') or len(pred) == len(lst)):
                fixed_subset = [(i, lst[i]) for i, p in enumerate(pred) if p]
            elif len(pred) < len(lst):
                fixed_subset = [(i, lst[i]) for i in pred]
            else:
                raise TypeError("Predicate {} not supported.".format(pred))
        except TypeError as err:
            raise TypeError("Predicate {} not supported. {}".format(pred, err))
        return fixed_subset
    #
    fixed_subset = extract_fixed_elements(predicate, lst)
    fixed_subset.reverse()      # Delete fixed elements from high index to low.
    for i, _ in fixed_subset:
        del lst[i]
    random.shuffle(lst)
    fixed_subset.reverse()      # Insert fixed elements from low index to high.
    for i, e in fixed_subset:
        lst.insert(i, e)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()
share|improve this answer

To shuffle a slice of the list in place, without copies, we can use a Knuth shuffle:

import random
def shuffle_slice(a, start, stop):
    i = start
    while (i < stop-1):
        idx = random.randrange(i, stop)
        a[i], a[idx] = a[idx], a[i]
        i += 1

It does the same thing as random.shuffle, except on a slice:

>>> a = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> shuffle_slice(a, 0, 3)
>>> a
[2, 0, 1, 3, 4, 5]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.