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Tables and its details

"user" table stores user details and have 10 millions record

How much time does a query like this take ?

select * from user where user_name = "Jhon"
select * from user where uid = "2331234534"
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closed as not a real question by Evan Mulawski, Andrew Marshall, Brian Roach, cHao, Jonathon Reinhart Mar 4 '12 at 17:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Maybe you should learn before attempting something that big. –  Evan Mulawski Mar 4 '12 at 17:33
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@EvanMulawski thats why i ask here because i known here are many master who loves to share and help others :) –  Danish Iqbal Mar 4 '12 at 17:34
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We cannot teach an entire subject to you. Get a book on MySQL. –  Evan Mulawski Mar 4 '12 at 17:36
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Please... not another social networking site –  Chris Laplante Mar 4 '12 at 17:37
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The answer is, of course, "it depends". We can't tell you how long a query will take to execute. It depends on hardware, keys, indexes, and many other factors. Entire books have been written on this subject. It isn't a question that you can expect a meaningful response to in the form of a Q/A site. Once you've made your site and have some concrete details to provide, you can try asking again. Until then it's all theoretical. –  Jeremy Wiggins Mar 4 '12 at 17:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

if you want the query to run with max speed, ensure you have indexes on "user_name" and "uid" and just in case you can add LIMIT 1 at the end of each of them

they should return result almost instantly with indexes - way below 1 second.

UPDATE about indexes:
A very good explanation how indexes work is comparison to a library. If you have huge library with millions of books and you do not have indexes, whenever someone search for a certain book, you need to go through all bookshelfs. If you have indexes, you know that this book is in this certain place and you just go there and take it. That is why it really doesn't matter that much if you have 1 million or 10 millions or 20 millions. Of course at some point you will have to reduce the size of the table but don't be worried at all

UPDATE about indexing all fields:
you should not index all columns. The reason why is as follows: it is always tradeoff. Indexes speeds up READING from the database greatly, but they slow WRITING to it. Everytime you add a row to the database, index list must be refreshed - that is why you should index only collumns you really need to be indexed

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the main problem is that this table have 10 millions records only for example not in reality actually i am worried about the future problem :) and thank you so much for indexes suggestion i don't have much knowledge about this i here about this today i will search more about this so what do you how much did time this query takes ? –  Danish Iqbal Mar 4 '12 at 17:38
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@Danish - these query are very simple and they are not a problem. A very good explanation how indexes works is comparison to a library. If you have huge library with millions of books and you do not have indexes, whenever someone search for a certain book, you need to go through all bookshelfs. If you have indexes, you know that this book is in this certain place and you just go there and take it. That is why it really doesn't matter that much if you have 1 million or 10 millions or 20 millions. Of course at some point you will have to reduce the size of the table but don't be worried at all –  mkk Mar 4 '12 at 17:51
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No, do not index every column. I would suggest buying this book: amazon.com/Beginning-MySQL-Database-Design-Optimization/dp/…. It is a good beginner's book for MySQL optimization and database design. –  Chris Laplante Mar 4 '12 at 17:51
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@Danish you are wrong. It will be way below 1 second. If you set index on the column that you use in "where" –  mkk Mar 4 '12 at 17:52
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@Danish you should not index all columns. The reason why is as follows: it is always tradeoff. Indexes speeds up READING from the database greatly, but they slow WRITING to it. Everytime you add a row to the database, index list must be refreshed - that is why you should index only collumns you really need to be indexed –  mkk Mar 4 '12 at 17:53

First, congratulations for having 10 million users.

The time it takes depends on everything - how much RAM, what's the bandwidth, how fast is the CPU on the database server.

To speed it up, make sure the uid column has an index associated with it, though if it's the primary key it should have done that already.

To find out how long it took, run it in PHPMyAdmin or some other tool and it will tell you. If that's not an option, if you are using php, then you could run it like this:

<?php
$start_time = microtime(TRUE); 

$result = mysql_query("select * from user where user_name = \"Jhon\"");

$end_time = microtime(TRUE); 
echo "That query took ".$end_time - $start_time." seconds.";
?>

As a general rule, selecting by an int will be faster than a string - the uid method is the one to go with. This also allows you to have more that one user called Jhon.

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Ha ha, for the congrats of 10 million –  yehuda Mar 4 '12 at 17:37
    
10m user is just for example actually i am worried about future is there any other way to known about the time –  Danish Iqbal Mar 4 '12 at 17:41
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In reality, if you had 10,000,000 users, you would have many more issues than this query. You would likely have many servers, or be using specialised tools for different things to get the speed required. Treat what you are writing now as a prototype, improve things as you need to, but don't get hung up on things like this until you have to. –  Rich Bradshaw Mar 4 '12 at 17:48

Those are 2 queries:

select * from user where user_name = "Jhon";

select * from user where uid = "2331234534";

if table user has indexes for user_name and uid should not take long to execute

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