Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
int A(const char* name){     
    name = "Here you GO!";    
    char* new_name;      
    //strcpy(new_name,name);      
    new_name = const_cast<char *>(name);      
    printf("%s\n", new_name);      
    return 0;    
}

This is the source code which I am testing.

one problem is when I use const_cast<char *>, it says it is undeclared. (I know it can work under 'g++' compiling) Anther problem is when I try to use strcpy to combine them together, it pops up segmentation fault. the premise is I have to use gcc whatevername.c -std=c99 to compile.

Is anyone offer some suggestion how to solve that. Much appreciate..

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to allocate space for the new string. You were on the right track using strcpy, because const_cast is C++ only. Edit: Even better use strdupas Miroslav suggests.

int A(const char* name)
{ 
    name = "Here you GO!";
    char* new_name = malloc(strlen(name)+1);
    if (new_name) {
        strcpy(new_name,name);
        printf("%s\n", new_name);
    }
    return 0;
]
share|improve this answer

You are getting segmentation fault, because new_name points nowhere.

Solution: allocate memory for new_name. You can either call malloc() and then use strcpy(), or call strdup() which will do both things for you:

int A(const char* name){ 

name = "Here you GO!";

char* new_name = strdup(name);

printf("%s\n", new_name);

return 0;
}

See this answer for more details on strdup(): http://stackoverflow.com/questions/252782/strdup-what-does-it-do-in-c

share|improve this answer
    
strdup doesn't always exist... –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 4 '12 at 17:48

const_cast is a C++ thing; it doesn't exist in C.

If you want to use strcpy, you can't just use an uninitialised pointer (i.e. new_name). You need to allocate sufficient space first (with malloc), and then free that space when you are done with it.

share|improve this answer

You haven't allocated space for new_name. Allocate enough to hold the string you are copying into it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.