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i have one data file in which data are filled in this manner

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
    .
    .

    .

    .
    .
91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

i want to store this data in a matrix of (10,10) this is my program

program test
integer j,n,m
character,dimension(10,10) ::text
character*50 line
open(unit=3,file="tmp.txt",status='old')
n=1
read(3,"(a50)"),line

read(line,*,end=1),(text(1,i),i=1,10)
1 read(3,"(a50)",end=3),line
n=n+1
read(line,*,end=1)(text(n,i),i=i,10)

3 close(3)

end program test

but i am not getting correct values.

share|improve this question
2  
It looks as if you are reading characters all of which happen to be either numeric digits or spaces. Is that correct ? Or are you trying to read integers and using character variables as some kind of buffer. That's not the way to read Fortran integers from a file. I'm puzzled too by your declaration of the array text. It's certainly correct Fortran to have a 2D array of characters, but often it's a sign of a C programmer carrying over inappropriate language idioms. –  High Performance Mark Mar 4 '12 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

Assuming you are happy with having the numbers stored as integers, the simplest way is to do it like this:

    PROGRAM read_data

    integer :: i
    integer :: numbers(39,39)
    character(10) :: infile = "data.dat"
    character(10) :: outfile = "output.dat"

    open(1,file=infile)
    open(2,file=outfile)

    do i=1,39
        read(1,*) numbers(i,1:39)
    end do

    !write output to check
    do i=1,39
        write(2,'(39I5)') numbers(i,1:39)
    end do

    close(1)
    close(2)

    END PROGRAM

I wouldn't recommend using strings to store variables of any kind as Fortran is not very good at string handling. If you at some point need to use your data as strings, write it to a string variable like you would write to a file:

write(my_string,'(I5)') numbers(1,1)

Edit: changed code to read in 39x39 size array instead of 10x10.

share|improve this answer
    
actually i have .dat file & it contains 39 by 39 matrix elements..so i can't copy that into .csv file..please write code how can i read & access those data in fortran program –  user991852 Mar 5 '12 at 18:35
1  
@user991852 if the data is stored like you say in the question, the code should work, you just need to change the loop length & array size to 39. List-directed input in fortran (the * in the read statement) works for both space- and comma-separated values. –  bananafish Mar 5 '12 at 20:29
    
thanks..a lot..i got it –  user991852 Mar 6 '12 at 3:59

I don't think doing the reading into a string first and then trying to parse that is the way to go; just let Fortran to break the space-delimited line up into character strings for you. Also note that you want your character array to be an array of something-length character strings, not just of characters:

program test
    character(len=3),dimension(10,10) ::text
    character(len=7), parameter :: filename="tmp.txt"
    integer :: i,j
    integer :: nlines

    open(unit=3,file=filename)
    do i=1,10
        write(3,fmt="(10(i3,1x))"), (10*(i-1)+j, j=1,10)
    enddo
    close(unit=3)

    open(unit=4,file=filename,status='old')

    do i=1,10
        read(4,*,end=1), (text(i,j),j=1,10)
    enddo
 1  nlines = i
    close(unit=4)

    print *,' Read in character array: '
    do i=1,nlines-1
        print "(10('<',a,'>',1x))", (trim(text(i,j)), j=1,10)
    enddo

end program test

Running this gives

$ ./test 
  Read in character array: 
<1> <2> <3> <4> <5> <6> <7> <8> <9> <10>
<11> <12> <13> <14> <15> <16> <17> <18> <19> <20>
<21> <22> <23> <24> <25> <26> <27> <28> <29> <30>
<31> <32> <33> <34> <35> <36> <37> <38> <39> <40>
<41> <42> <43> <44> <45> <46> <47> <48> <49> <50>
<51> <52> <53> <54> <55> <56> <57> <58> <59> <60>
<61> <62> <63> <64> <65> <66> <67> <68> <69> <70>
<71> <72> <73> <74> <75> <76> <77> <78> <79> <80>
<81> <82> <83> <84> <85> <86> <87> <88> <89> <90>
<91> <92> <93> <94> <95> <96> <97> <98> <99> <100>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks ..so can i access these values as integers..example if i want to multiply 2 in text(3,33) then what should be the command –  user991852 Mar 5 '12 at 18:21
    
is this correct text(3,33)*2 –  user991852 Mar 5 '12 at 18:22
    
sorry..replace text(3,33) with (3,3) –  user991852 Mar 5 '12 at 18:25
    
No; they're text. If you want to read them into an array of integers, so you can use them as numbers, then you should use @bananafish's answer, and read them in not as a character array but as an integer array; everything else is the same above. Eg, replace character(len=3),dimension(10,10) ::text with integer, dimension(10,10) :: text and the only other thing you have to change is the output, print "(10('<',a,'>',1x))", (trim(text(i,j))!, j=1,10) becomes print "(10('<',I3,'>',1x))", (text(i,j)!, j=1,10). –  Jonathan Dursi Mar 5 '12 at 18:54
    
er, no exclamation mark in the print lines there, sorry. –  Jonathan Dursi Mar 5 '12 at 19:05

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