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Let's say I have a function that can compute one output from one input, e.g.

function y = sqrt_newton(x)
    y = x ./ 2;
    yo = y;
    y = 0.5.*(y + x ./ y);
    while abs(y - yo) > eps * abs(y)
        yo = y;
        y = 0.5.*(y + x ./ y);
    end
end

I'd like to be able to apply this function to a vector input say sqrt_newton(2:9) like with built-in functions. What is the best way to achieve this with a condition at the beginning of the loop or some if-clause inside? I'd like to avoid writing an extra function as a wrapper just to loop through the input vector, if possible at all.

My current cumbersome solution

What I do up until now is:

  • I have to expand first the inputs to the same size (using finargsz from the finance toolbox, but if you know of another core function that does the same, that would be great)

  • record the shape using size

  • deal the inputs

  • loop thru all the input elements

  • reshape the output

It seems that the numel function alleviates the need of all this heavy lifting but extra comments would be most welcome.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's always arrayfun. You can keep the code you have, putting it into an inner function.

function y = sqrt_newton(z)

    y = arrayfun(@inner, z);

    function y= inner(x)
        y = x ./ 2;
        yo = y;
        y = 0.5.*(y + x ./ y);
        while abs(y - yo) > eps * abs(y)
            yo = y;
            y = 0.5.*(y + x ./ y);
        end
    end
end

Edit: The above solution has the advantage of being trivial to implement after you have it working with a 1x1 input, but the loops in the other answers are way faster for large inputs. For example, on my computer, the code

tic; sqrt_newton(rand(500)); toc

runs in ~1.24 seconds with my code, 0.06 seconds with @Ramashalanka's code, and 0.28 seconds with @GuntherStruyf's code.

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Well, I like your solution as it has a minimal overhead with respect to the original function. Too bad it's so sluggish. –  green diod Mar 5 '12 at 1:03

I think in general you'll have to use a loop, because of the unknown character of the operation of the function. In case it's a linear operation, vectorization is possible.

For your example I'd use the following:

function y = sqrt_newton(x)
    y = x ./ 2;
    yo = y;
    y = 0.5.*(y + x ./ y);
    for i=1:numel(x)
        while abs(y(i) - yo(i)) > eps * abs(y(i))
            yo(i) = y(i);
            y(i) = 0.5*(y(i) + x(i) / y(i));
        end
    end
end

I use numel, instead of size, so it can handle any array I throw at it

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In fact, I use a similar solution but I was expecting some other way to do it neatly. See my extra comment under the question. –  green diod Mar 5 '12 at 1:12

Well, you could vectorize it as follows (with any):

function y = sqrt_newton(x)
    y = x / 2;
    yo = y;
    y = 0.5*(y + x ./ y);
    while any(abs(y - yo) > eps * abs(y))
        yo = y;
        y = 0.5*(y + x ./ y);
    end
end

Then you get:

>> sqrt_newton(2:9)
ans =
    1.4142    1.7321    2.0000    2.2361    2.4495    2.6458    2.8284    3.0000

>> ans.^2-(2:9)
ans =
   1.0e-14 *
   -0.0444   -0.0444         0    0.0888   -0.0888    0.0888   -0.1776         0

as expected. However, I wouldn't recommend it, since you're doing unnecessary operations on elements that have already converged. I'd just use a for loop over x at the start of the function:

function yall = sqrt_newton(xall)
yall = zeros(size(xall));
for xn=1:numel(xall)
    x = xall(xn);
    y = x / 2;
    yo = y;
    y = 0.5*(y + x ./ y);
    while abs(y - yo) > eps * abs(y)
        yo = y;
        y = 0.5*(y + x ./ y);
    end
    yall(xn)=y;
end
end

Set the size yall at the start to avoid it increasing in size throughout the loop.

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