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I'm writing a C# remote control for my media player. It runs on my Android phone.

I have a client app listening for TCP connections on my computer which, one a connection has been established, processes commands (Volume up, volume down, ...). I've tested that part using telnet 127.0.0.1 on my computer, and it works great.

Things are trickier when it comes to connecting from my phone, since it's not on the same network (I don't have Wi-Fi, only wired connections), so I'm not sure how to proceed. Basically I want to connect to a computer that's behind a router.

Should I rather host the TCP server on my phone, and have the PC connect to it? Take IRC as an example: although I'm behind a router, I can connect to servers outside, without port forwarding. Or if hosting the server on my computer is fine, how do I connect to it?

I don't understand everything to this yet, so feel free to correct me if I got something wrong.

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"I have a client app listening for TCP connections"... I think you mean a server app. Clients connects to servers, servers wait for connections. :) –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 5 '12 at 7:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Things are trickier when it comes to connecting from my phone, since it's not on the same network (I don't have Wi-Fi, only wired connections), so I'm not sure how to proceed. Basically I want to connect to a computer that's behind a router.

What you want to achieve is possible, but you need to learn about NAT traversal and hole punching.

Most often, devices behind a NAT/Router have a private IP address only valid on the LAN. Remote devices can't guess it. This private address is translated into a public IP address by the NAT when the device wants to communicate with the WAN.

The easy solution is you can give a public IP address to the device behind the NAT. In this case, remote devices on the WAN will easily be able to reach it, because its address is public.

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It would be more logical to keep the PC hosting the server, and configure your router to forward connections to your PC. You have two options:

  • Establish a DMZ: all incoming connections on the router will be forwarded to one PC only. This is easiest when you only have 1 PC on the network that needs to accept connections.
  • Configure port forwarding: you can instruct the router to forward connections incoming on port X to the IP Y on port Z. This way, multiple PC's can listing for connections (using different ports on the router). It is also a bit more secure.

How to set these up depends on your router, but most routers just accept connections on their port 80 and offer an easy web-interface. If you give your router brand, we can link you to the manual.

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But how do IRC connections work? How come I don't need port forwarding for IRC? (Or even HTTP?) –  Clément Mar 4 '12 at 22:42
    
Thanks for your answer btw. I've set up port forwarding, and everything works correctly; but that makes the app far from straightforward. Is there no way to do without port forwarding? –  Clément Mar 4 '12 at 22:44
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You do not need port forwarding for IRC, because it is your PC that connects to IRC. Your router will see that your PC tries to connect, and uses NAT (Network Address Translation) to transfer the returning packets from the server to your PC. –  Konerak Mar 4 '12 at 22:45
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Port forwarding is just a one-time setup on your router. It has nothing to do with the application. If you would wish to sell your application, you could try to have a third-party host 'mediate' the connection... the PC connects to a website, your smartphone connects to a website, and the website tries to have both of them establish a direct connection - and if it fails, keeps mediating the connection. For personal use, what you have now should be more than enough, no? –  Konerak Mar 4 '12 at 22:47
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Exactly, but since both parties know each-others IP address, they both listen to connections on their port A, and try to connect to the other party on their port A. The first connection "wins". So yes, the phone will not be able to reach the PC, but the PC will reach the phone. All the webpage does is give both eachother's IP address. Anyway, it's just an idea ;] –  Konerak Mar 5 '12 at 7:54

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