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Ok let's say I have 2 states (s1 and s2). s1 can go to s2 with event e1 and s2 can go to s1 with event e2.

Now, let's also assume that e1 and e2 are only fired from s1 and s2 respectively if certain conditions apply.

so in main() I will first of start by starting the state machine using start() then Ill have an infinite loop. In that loop I need to be able to keep going in the state machine at the same state I left it. How can I do that?

i.e. Let say I was in s2 and I execute all the code in s2 and I did not fire e2 then I left the state and I hit the end of my while loop now I want to go back to s2 to continue from there and see if this time e2 will fire.

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The short answer is: make a third kind of event which causes an internal transition in both states and post it in your endless loop in main.

The long answer starts with the question why would anyone want to do that? At least in my experience state machines should be more of an event driven concept which react to OUTSIDE events. Using polling (which it looks like what your after) inside a state machine is not really what state machines are for. I would do the polling outside the state machine (in main in your case) and when I do get an event then post that to the state machine.

Its also common for a state to set a timer (again outside the state machine) to post a "timeout event" (or any other event for that matter) after a certain duration of time. Its good practice in my mind to cancel that request on exiting the state which requested it. Even if it seems useless in some cases because there is no reason to leave the state now it sure helps the poor maintenance programmer who implements a new event exiting the state and then tears his hair out wondering why he got a "timeout event" three state transitions later.

If you are new to state machines I would highly suggest Miro Samek's book: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0750687061/quantumleap06-20

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