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I have a NumPy array of values. I want to count how many of these values are in a specific range say x<100 and x>25. I have read about the counter, but it seems to only be valid for specif values not ranges of values. I have searched, but have not found anything regarding my specific problem. If someone could point me towards the proper documentation I would appreciate it. Thank you

I have tried this

   X = array(X)
   for X in range(25,100):
       print(X)

But it just gives me the numbers in between 25 and 99.

EDIT The data I am using was created by another program. I then used a script to read the data and store it as a list. I then took the list and turned it in to an array using array(r).

Edit

The result of running

 a[0:10]
 array(['29.63827346', '40.61488812', '25.48300065', '26.22910525',
   '42.41172923', '20.15013315', '34.95323355', '13.03604098',
   '29.71097606', '9.53222141'], 
  dtype='<U11')
share|improve this question
    
@Senderle that did it thank you so much!! I tried Sven's method after reconverting the array and it worked perfectly! Thanks again –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 2:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If your array is called a, the number of elements fulfilling 25 < x < 100 is

((25 < a) & (a < 100)).sum()

The expression (25 < a) & (a < 100) results in a Boolean array with the same shape as a with the value True for all elements that satisfy the condition. Summing over this Boolean array treats True values as 1 and False values as 0.

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@SvenI tried your method, but got this error TypeError: unorderable types: int() < numpy.ndarray() –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 0:38
1  
@Surfcast23: Works for me. What version of NumPy and Python are you using? –  Sven Marnach Mar 5 '12 at 0:49
    
I am running Python 3.2 –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 1:03
    
Works for me under Python 3.2.2 and numpy 1.6.1. –  DSM Mar 5 '12 at 1:08
3  
Oh, I know what might be happening. The unorderable types error is the one you'd get if the dtype was something unexpected -- e.g. 2 < numpy.array(range(10), dtype=str) gives exactly this message. –  DSM Mar 5 '12 at 1:17

Sven's answer is the way to do it if you don't wish to further process matching values.
The following two examples return copies with only the matching values:

np.compress((25 < a) & (a < 100), a).size

Or:

a[(25 < a) & (a < 100)].size

Example interpreter session:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> a = np.random.randint(200,size=100)
>>> a
array([194, 131,  10, 100, 199, 123,  36,  14,  52, 195, 114, 181, 138,
       144,  70, 185, 127,  52,  41, 126, 159,  39,  68, 118, 124, 119,
        45, 161,  66,  29, 179, 194, 145, 163, 190, 150, 186,  25,  61,
       187,   0,  69,  87,  20, 192,  18, 147,  53,  40, 113, 193, 178,
       104, 170, 133,  69,  61,  48,  84, 121,  13,  49,  11,  29, 136,
       141,  64,  22, 111, 162, 107,  33, 130,  11,  22, 167, 157,  99,
        59,  12,  70, 154,  44,  45, 110, 180, 116,  56, 136,  54, 139,
        26,  77, 128,  55, 143, 133, 137,   3,  83])
>>> np.compress((25 < a) & (a < 100),a).size
34
>>> a[(25 < a) & (a < 100)].size
34

The above examples use a "bit-wise and" (&) to do an element-wise computation along the two boolean arrays which you create for comparison purposes.
Another way to write Sven's excellent answer, for example, is:

np.bitwise_and(25 < a, a < 100).sum() 

The boolean arrays contain True values when the condition matches, and False when it doesn't.
A bonus aspect of boolean values is that True is equivalent to 1 and False to 0.

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@Sevn and Adam, I am still pretty new to python ~6 months not very consistently though. Can you guys explain how and why your scripts work? Thank you –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 0:55
    
Or point me towards where I can read up on it. –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 1:10
    
@Surfcast23: I added a bit of an explanation. Keep at it! –  bernie Mar 5 '12 at 1:14
    
@Adam thank you for the explanation! –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 1:40
1  
It seems more natural to use numpy.logical_and() instead of numpy.bitwise_and() here. The result will be the same, but it feels more "conceptually right". –  Sven Marnach Mar 5 '12 at 12:36

You could use histogram. Here's a basic usage example:

>>> import numpy
>>> a = numpy.random.random(size=100) * 100 
>>> numpy.histogram(a, bins=(0.0, 7.3, 22.4, 55.5, 77, 79, 98, 100))
(array([ 8, 14, 34, 31,  0, 12,  1]), 
 array([   0. ,    7.3,   22.4,   55.5,   77. ,   79. ,   98. ,  100. ]))

In your particular case, it would look something like this:

>>> numpy.histogram(a, bins=(25, 100))
(array([73]), array([ 25, 100]))

Additionally, when you have a list of strings, you have to explicitly specify the type, so that numpy knows to produce an array of floats instead of a list of strings.

>>> strings = [str(i) for i in range(10)]
>>> numpy.array(strings)
array(['0', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9'], 
      dtype='|S1')
>>> numpy.array(strings, dtype=float)
array([ 0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  4.,  5.,  6.,  7.,  8.,  9.])
share|improve this answer
    
I will give it a try thanks! –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 0:31
    
@Surfcast23, yeah, this one is more general-purpose, but if you really only need one bin, Sven's will be faster. –  senderle Mar 5 '12 at 0:34
    
I ran the code and got (array([-481], dtype=int32), array([ 25, 100])) What concerns me is the negative sign how should I interpret it? –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 1:08
    
@Surfcast23, so many strange results. I'm starting to think there's something you haven't told us about your data. What's the dtype of this array? –  senderle Mar 5 '12 at 2:16
    
@ Senderle the data is just an array of floats here are the first several values 40.61488812 25.48300065 26.22910525 42.41172923 20.15013315 34.95323355 13.03604098 29.71097606 9.53222141 13.08244932 38.04509923 20.16046549 29.40530862 –  Surfcast23 Mar 5 '12 at 2:34

I think @Sven Marnach answer is quite nice, because it operates in on the numpy array itself which will be fast and efficient (C implementation).

I like to put the test into one condition like 25 < x < 100, so I would probably do it something like this:

len([x for x in a.ravel() if 25 < x < 100])

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1  
Nice. To use gen-expr: sum(1 for i in a.ravel() if 25 < i < 100) –  bernie Mar 5 '12 at 1:25
    
that is good too. at first i tried to use len() on a generator and to my surprise it doesn't work –  wim Mar 5 '12 at 1:28
    
@wim: len() does not work with generator expressions because iterators do not generally have a finite length. This is why the sum(1 …) approach is better: it has a fixed and much smaller memory footprint, since you don't have to create an intermediate list. –  EOL May 7 '12 at 8:22
    
@wim thank you for the additional method! –  Surfcast23 May 9 '12 at 2:14

Building on Sven's good approach, you can also do the more direct:

numpy.count_nonzero((25 < a) & (a < 100))

This first creates an array of booleans with one boolean for each input number in array a, and then count the number of non-False (i.e. True) values (which gives the number of matching numbers).

Note, however, that this approach is twice as slow as Sven's .sum() approach, on an array of 100k numbers (NumPy 1.6.1, Python 2.7.3)–about 300 µs versus 150 µs.

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