Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The example code here solves a project Euler problem:

Starting with the number 1 and moving to the right in a clockwise direction a 5 by 5 spiral is formed as follows:

 21 22 23 24 25 
 20  7  8  9 10  
 19  6  1  2 11    
 18  5  4  3 12 
 17 16 15 14 13

It can be verified that the sum of the numbers on the diagonals is 101.

What is the sum of the numbers on the diagonals in a 1001 by 1001 spiral formed in the same way?

but my question is a matter of functional programming style rather than about how to get the answer (I already have it). I am trying to teach myself a bit about functional programming by avoiding imperative loops in my solutions, and so came up with the following recursive function to solve problem 28:

let answer = 
    let dimensions = 1001
    let max_number = dimensions * dimensions

    let rec loop total increment increment_count current =
        if current > max_number then total
        else
            let new_inc, new_inc_count =
                if increment_count = 4 then increment + 2, 0
                else increment, increment_count + 1
            loop (total + current) new_inc new_inc_count (current + increment)            
    loop 0 2 1 1

However, it seems to me my function is a bit of a mess. The following imperative version is shorter and clearer, even after taking into account the fact that F# forces you to explicitly declare variables as mutable and doesn't include a += operator:

let answer = 
    let dimensions = 1001
    let mutable total = 1
    let mutable increment = 2
    let mutable current = 1

    for spiral_layer_index in {1..(dimensions- 1) / 2} do
        for increment_index in {1..4} do
            current <- current + increment
            total <- total + current 
        increment <- increment + 2
    total

Disregarding the fact that people with more maths ability have solved the problem analytically, is there a better way to do this in a functional style? I also tried using Seq.unfold to create a sequence of values and then piping the resulting sequence into Seq.sum, but this ended up being even messier than my recursive version.

share|improve this question
2  
both of your algorithms look messy because of variable names. I solved that problem and stared for 10 minutes into your code but still didn't got what is your intention in each line. Especially when you name variables like a and b. Whether you use loop or recursion here doesn't matter. –  Snowbear Mar 5 '12 at 1:07
    
I've edited the variable names to be a bit more useful –  junichiro Mar 5 '12 at 1:27
    
BTW: Your imperative solution produces different result than the functional solution. –  Tomas Petricek Mar 5 '12 at 1:52
    
now edited so they give the same answer –  junichiro Mar 5 '12 at 2:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since you didn't describe the problem you're trying to solve, this answer is based only on the F# code you posted. I agree that the functional version is a bit messy, but I believe it could be clearer. I don't really understand the nested for loop in your imperative solution:

for increment_index in {1..4} do 
  current <- current + increment 
  total <- total + current  

You're not using the increment_index for anything, so you could just multiply increment and current by four and get the same result:

total <- total + 4*current + 10*increment
current <- current + 4*increment

Then your imperative solution becomes:

let mutable total = 0 
let mutable increment = 2 
let mutable current = 1 

for spiral_layer_index in {1..(dimensions- 1) / 2} do 
  total <- total + 4*current + 10*increment
  current <- current + 4*increment
  increment <- increment + 2 
total 

If you rewrite this to a recursive function, it becomes just:

let rec loop index (total, current, increment) = 
  if index > (dimensions - 1) / 2 then total 
  else loop (index + 1) ( total + 4*current + 10*increment,
                          current + 4*increment, increment + 2 )
let total = loop 1 (0, 2, 1)

The same thing could be also written using Seq.fold like this (this is even more "functional", because in functional programming, you use recursion only to implement basic functions, like fold that can then be re-used):

let total, _, _=
  {1 .. (dimensions - 1) / 2} |> Seq.fold (fun (total, current, increment) _ ->
    (total + 4*current + 10*increment, current + 4 * increment, increment + 2)) (0, 1, 2)

NOTE: I'm not sure if this actually implements what you want. It is just a simplification of your imperative solution and then rewrite of that using a recursive function...

share|improve this answer

In fact, this is Project Euler Problem 28 and my F# solution circa November 21, 2011 is quite similar to one suggested in Tomas' answer:

let problem028 () =
    [1..500]
    |> List.fold (fun (accum, last) n ->
            (accum + 4*last + 20*n, last + 8*n)) (1,1)
    |> fst

Indeed, solution of the original problem takes just one-liner simple fold over the list of all involved squares with corners at diagonal nodes while threading through the accumulated sum and value of current diagonal element. Folding is one of the major idioms of functional programming; there is a great classic paper A tutorial on the universality and expressiveness of fold that covers many important facets of this core pattern.

share|improve this answer

Here's more of a direct translation of your imperative solution.

let answer = 
    let dimensions = 1001
    let sMax = (dimensions - 1) / 2
    let iMax = 4

    let rec spiral total increment s current =
        let rec innerLoop total i current =
            if i <= iMax then
                let current = current + increment
                innerLoop (total + current) (i + 1) current
            else
                total, current

        if s <= sMax then
            let total, current = innerLoop total 1 current
            spiral total (increment + 2) (s + 1) current
        else
            total 

    spiral 1 2 1 1
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.