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Many programs return their version number with a command like:

$ program --version
program (platform info) v1.2.3

This is useful for scripting the installation or maintenance of the program, and some other controlled automation magic from System Admins & friends.

Problem

How to easily get the version number for Erlang (OTP)?

On the net

Here are some unsatisfactory solutions ([1] and other tutorials/Erlang documentation):

Emulator

$ erl
1> erlang:system_info(otp_release).
"R13B03"

Hard to script. I have not found a way to have erl execute a single command from a shell prompt.

Release file

$ cat /usr/lib/erlang/releases/RELEASES
[{release,"OTP  APN 181 01","R13B03","5.7.4",
      [{kernel,"2.13.4","/usr/lib/erlang/lib/kernel-2.13.4"},
       {stdlib,"1.16.4","/usr/lib/erlang/lib/stdlib-1.16.4"},
       {sasl,"2.1.8","/usr/lib/erlang/lib/sasl-2.1.8"}],
      permanent}].

Parsing paradise (with shell).

An alternative could also be checking the install path, but that is not portable (my install path does not include the version, for one).

Personal context: I am writing a script to install the same version of RabbitMQ with plugins on several machines. Some plugins have minimal requirements on the OTP version, and it is how this question started.

[1] http://forum.trapexit.org/viewtopic.php?p=42946

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What's so bad about RELEASES? It's trivially parsed by Erlang :-) –  Julian Fondren Mar 5 '12 at 3:44
    
Ooops, nothing bad with that! I edited the post for the context. I meant parsing the Erlang string with shell tools. My goal is to script SA tasks for an Erlang package. –  Eric Platon Mar 5 '12 at 4:12
    
I don't understand Erlang syntax yet; I just want to check whether the installed version supports Riak or not. Starring this and hoping that one day Erlang will provide a simpler way to report its version to administrators of tools that depend on it. –  Iain Elder Dec 12 '13 at 23:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted
 erl -eval 'erlang:display(erlang:system_info(otp_release)), halt().'  -noshell
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sorry didn't see more comprehensive previous answer when I post it –  Odobenus Rosmarus Mar 5 '12 at 3:51
    
This prints (no error logger present) error: "Error in process <0.0.0> on Windows 7 for me. -1 –  Jonas Jan 16 at 11:42

init docs, linked by 'man erl'.

-eval Expr

Scans, parses and evaluates an arbitrary expression Expr during system initialization. If any of these steps fail (syntax error, parse error or exception during evaluation), Erlang stops with an error message. Here is an example that seeds the random number generator:

% erl -eval '{X,Y,Z} = now(), random:seed(X,Y,Z).'

This example uses Erlang as a hexadecimal calculator:

% erl -noshell -eval 'R = 16#1F+16#A0, io:format("~.16B~n", [R])'  -s erlang halt
BF

If multiple -eval expressions are specified, they are evaluated sequentially in the order specified. -eval expressions are evaluated sequentially with -s and -run function calls (this also in the order specified). As with -s and -run, an evaluation that does not terminate, blocks the system initialization process.

Thus,

$ erl -noshell -eval 'io:fwrite("~s\n", [erlang:system_info(otp_release)]).' -s erlang halt
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Thank you, Julian, for the detail. How could I forget to search the eval keyword in the manual? –  Eric Platon Mar 5 '12 at 4:10

erl +V or you can use erl -version

result : Erlang (SMP,ASYNC_THREADS) (BEAM) emulator version 5.8.5

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This returns the erl emulator version, not the Erlang release version number (e.g. "R15B03"). All that could be so easy ;-) –  Eric Platon Jun 18 '13 at 1:28

Finds the erl in your PATH and reads the RELEASES file to extract the erlang release number.

awk -F, 'NR==1 {gsub(/"/,"",$3);print $3}' "$(dirname $(readlink -f $(which erl)))/../releases/RELEASES"

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