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I am rolling a dice in a gui. I am getting the number I want returned(random int 1-6) but the image I want to display is not showing up. It shows the correct image the first time but never changes it. Here is the code:

public void layoutComponents()
{
     Container container = frame.getContentPane();
     container.setLayout(new GridLayout(1, 1));
     diceRoll.setEditable(true);
     container.add(button);
     container.add(addPanel());
     //container.add(diceRoll);
     frame.setSize(200, 200);
     frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
}

class DiceActions implements ActionListener
{
     @Override
     public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
     {
         layoutComponents();
         //diceRoll.append(Double.toString((int)numberRolled));
     }

}

public ImageIcon rollDice()
{
     double numberRolled = (int)(Math.random() * 10 + 1);
     ImageIcon image = dice1;
     if (numberRolled > 6)
     {
         numberRolled -= 4;
     }
     if(numberRolled == 1)
     {
         image = dice1;
         System.out.println("1");
         System.out.println(numberRolled);
         return image = dice1;
     }
     else if(numberRolled == 2)
     {
         image = dice2;
         System.out.println("2");
         return image = dice2;
     }
     else if(numberRolled == 3)
     {
         image = dice3;
         System.out.println("3");
         return image = dice3;
     }
     else if(numberRolled == 4)
     {
         image = dice4;
         System.out.println("4");
         return image = dice4;
     }
     else if(numberRolled == 5)
     {
         image = dice5;
         System.out.println("5");
         return image = dice5;
     }
     else if(numberRolled == 6)
     {
         image = dice6;
         System.out.println("6");
         return image = dice6;
     }
     else
         System.out.println("never reached");
     System.out.println(numberRolled);
     return image;
}

public JPanel addPanel()
{
     JPanel panel = new JPanel();
     panel.add(new JLabel(rollDice()));
     return panel;
}

public void addListeners()
{
     DiceActions action = new DiceActions();
     button.addActionListener(action);
}
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closed as not a real question by Michael Petrotta, Book Of Zeus, casperOne Mar 6 '12 at 2:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It keeps displaying dice1 image –  user1198199 Mar 5 '12 at 2:16
    
1) For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. 2) Please use a consistent and logical indent for code blocks. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 5 '12 at 2:23
3  
So, you want us to tell you where the GUI code is wrong, but you don't give us all the code. One way to study it on your own is to cut it down to essentials; if you still don't find your problem, perhaps then it will be small enough to post the whole thing. –  arcy Mar 5 '12 at 2:24

2 Answers 2

double numberRolled = (int)(Math.random() * 10 + 1);

I'm not sure about it (I mean, how JVM handles it), but it may cause some rounding problem thus causing == operator to give false. You've typecast-ed it to int, so why not store it as an int as well?

return image = dice1;, return image = dice2; and so on...

Why don't you simply `return diceX;'? No need to have local ImageIcon variable. It may work in Java as it still carries C semantic of = operator but could spit out unexpected result if you don't intend to do so.

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double numberRolled = (int)(Math.random() * 10 + 1);
ImageIcon image = dice1;
if (numberRolled > 6)
{
    numberRolled -= 4;
}

This code fails to produce uniformly random numbers. Anyone playing games with your code will quickly learn that the results are not random.

I ran this code through Lindent to make it tolerable to read and took out some of the code in the middle; just pay attention to the general flow of the thing:

ImageIcon image = dice1;

if (numberRolled > 6) {
    numberRolled -= 4;
}
if (numberRolled == 1) {
    image = dice1;
    System.out.println("1");
    System.out.println(numberRolled);
    return image = dice1;
}
/* ... */
else if (numberRolled == 6) {
    image = dice6;
    System.out.println("6");
    return image = dice6;
} else
    System.out.println("never reached");

System.out.println(numberRolled);
return image;

Note that you've initialized the image to dice1. This is probably a bad idea, as it makes finding bugs significantly harder. Instead, initialize it to null, so that your other code will die a miserable death (NullPointerException) if the rest of the code does not set the value properly.

But throw that whole thing away; what you want to do is use an array to store the relationship between the die images and the value. It'll be 1/6th the code, less buggy, and easier to extend to a ten, twelve, or twenty sided die.

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