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I haven't worked with c++ in a while, but I just started a project with it. This may not be possible, but Im trying to create a template class with an array that sets its size to the value of a constant which i'm trying to set with the constructor.

This is the code of the constructor:

Tarray(int s): start_size(s){
    }

This is the code that sets the array size:

const int start_size;
T this_array[start_size];

This is the entire file:

#ifndef TARRAY_H_
#define TARRAY_H_


template<typename T>
class Tarray {
private:
    const int start_size;
    T this_array[start_size];
    int array_size;
public:
    Tarray(int s): start_size(s){
    }
    ~Tarray(){
        delete[] this_array;
    }
    T & operator[](int i){
        return this_array[i];
    }
};



#endif /* TARRAY_H_ */

These are the errors I get:

..\/template_array/Tarray.h:16:24: error: 'Tarray<T>::start_size' cannot appear in a constant-expression
..\/template_array/Tarray.h:16:34: error: 'new' cannot appear in a constant-expression
..\/template_array/Tarray.h:16:34: error: ISO C++ forbids initialization of member 'this_array' [-fpermissive]
..\/template_array/Tarray.h:16:34: error: making 'this_array' static [-fpermissive]
..\/template_array/Tarray.h: In instantiation of 'Tarray<Person>':
..\Human.cpp:17:24:   instantiated from here
..\/template_array/Tarray.h:16:34: error: invalid in-class initialization of static data member of non-integral type 'Person*'
Build error occurred, build is stopped
Time consumed: 343  ms. 

The error messages have been changing as I try to tweak the code, but these are the errors from this particular build.

Thanks for any help

share|improve this question
1  
use std::vector<> –  Michael Burr Mar 5 '12 at 2:26
    
Thanks, but i'm still wondering how you do this. I haven't used c++ in a while, and I'm trying to re-learn it. –  sinθ Mar 5 '12 at 2:28
    
How would sizeof work if such a construct was allowed? –  David Schwartz Mar 5 '12 at 2:36
    
C++ doesn't support variable length arrays in that way. C99 does, but not C++ (not even C++11). GNU supports them in C++ as an extension, but for automatic variables, not class members (as far as I know). You need to use new/malloc explicitly, or use vector and let that class manage the dynamic allocation for you (the better way to go in almost all cases). –  Michael Burr Mar 5 '12 at 2:36
    
If the value is only known at runtime, then the array has to be dynamically allocated using new. If the value is known at compile time, then it can be a template parameter and the template parameter can be used for the array size. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 5 '12 at 2:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The reason you're getting compiler errors is this line:

T this_array[start_size];

This line would make your Tarray actually contain start_size instances of T. It wouldn't hold a pointer or reference to these instances - they would be part of same block of memory that contains the Tarray's other instance variables. This would make the class' size depend on start_size, and start_size is not known at compile time. The size of any C++ class must be known at compile time, this isn't possible.

There are two ways to solve this:

  1. Allocate the array of T instances on the heap, using array new. This is what std::vector does. Writing such a class and getting it to behave right when it's copied/moved/expanded/etc is difficult and tedious, so I'd recommend just using std::vector instead.
  2. Make the number of T instances fixed, and pass it as a template parameter

i.e.:

template<typename T, std::size_t N>
class TArray
{
    ...
    T this_array[N];
    ...
}

This is what std::array (C++11 only) and boost::array do. Again, I'd recommend using one of these instead of writing your own. Unless this is homework, of course...

Lastly, it's worth noting that this is an error:

~Tarray(){
    delete[] this_array;
}

this_array wasn't allocated with new, so you shouldn't delete it. If the array is part of the class as it is here (rather than being separately heap-allocated and owned by the class), then it will be destroyed along with the rest of the class by default. Calling delete is not only unnecessary, it will almost certainly cause a crash.

share|improve this answer

You have to create the array at run time.

template<typename T>
class Tarray {
private:
    const int start_size;
    T* this_array;
    int array_size;

    Tarray( const Tarrat& inObj ); // no copy

public:
    Tarray(int s): start_size(s), this_array( new T[s] ) {
    }
    ~Tarray(){
        delete[] this_array;
    }
    T & operator[](int i){
        return this_array[i];
    }
};

Note, for this to work, T must have a default constructor (that is, a constructor that takes no arguments).

share|improve this answer
    
This code will be very fragile - what happens if you accidentally copy it? –  Arafangion Mar 5 '12 at 2:32
    
The question was how to create vectors in a template, which I answered. However, no accidental copying should occur because a constructor has been declared (which prevents the compiler from auto creating constructors), but no copy constructor has been declared. As a result, the compiler will complain if there were any implicit copies occurring. Fragility averted. I'd appreciate the -1 taken away, thank you. –  claireware Mar 5 '12 at 3:28
    
The compiler will auto-generate a copy-constructor for you. If you want to specify no copy-constructor, you need to provide it as an explicitly private constructor, but then fail to provide an implementation. Also, in order for me to remove the -1, the answer needs to be updated. –  Arafangion Mar 5 '12 at 4:22
    
My bad, I was confused with default constructors. Updated. –  claireware Mar 5 '12 at 4:46

The following code does something similar but not using the constructor:

#ifndef TARRAY_H_ 
#define TARRAY_H_ 


template<int SizeT> 
class Tarray { 
private: 
    T this_array[SizeT]; 
public: 
    Tarray() {} 
    ~Tarray() {} 
    T & operator[](int i){ 
        return this_array[i]; 
    } 
}; 

#endif /* TARRAY_H_ */ 

and you can use it like this:

TArray<10> myArray;
share|improve this answer

std::vector is precisely the tool for this job:

template<typename T>
class Tarray {
private:
    std::vector<T> this_array;
public:
    Tarray(int s): this_array(s){
    }
    ~Tarray(){
    }
    T & operator[](int i){
        return this_array[i];
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
this_array.reserve(s) would have been better. –  iammilind Mar 5 '12 at 2:47
    
@iammilind disagree, the semantics would be completely different as the elements would not be created if only reserve is called. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 5 '12 at 3:21
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas, I know, it's just reserved. And that is the purpose. With vector::reserve() one can initialize the elements on need bases. If out of size s, only half is going to be used then no point in creating whole array. –  iammilind Mar 5 '12 at 3:32

Use std::vector instead, and make life simple for yourself. :)

(If you want a fixed-size array, then std::array might be a possibility, I think that's in C++11, if not, then boost probably has an implementation).

If you insist on having that ordinary array syntax, though, as if you were using ye-olde C, then you will need to use a template parameter, such that your template class has two arguments - one for the 'T' it already has now, and another for the array size.

You are making life especially difficult by managing that array yourself - if you feel you have to define a destructor, you really should define the copy constructor in addition to the constructor. (That's called the Rule Of The Big Three, if I recall correctly), instead, rely on RAII and avoid having to ever explicitly call operator delete or delete[] yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I still get errors like "'Tarray<T>::start_size' cannot appear in a constant-expression" –  sinθ Mar 5 '12 at 2:33
    
@Mike G: If you're using std::vector, then there is no point in keeping a ::start_size. That said, you've specified 'const' there without giving it a value. (And you can't do THAT in a class like that) –  Arafangion Mar 5 '12 at 2:41

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