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I have a folder with several hundreds of folders inside it. These folders contain another folder each, called images, and in this folder there is sometimes a strictly numerically named .jpg file. Sometimes there are other JPG files in the folder as well, but these need to be ignored if they aren't strictly numeric.

I would like to learn how to write a script which would, when run in a given folder, traverse every single subfolder and look for this numeric file. It would then add the "_n" suffix to a copy of each, if such a file does not already exist.

Can this be done through the unix terminal easily?

To be more specific, this is the structure I'm dealing with:

  • master folder
    • 18556
      • images
        • 2234.jpg
    • 47772
      • images
        • 2234.jpg
        • 2234_n.jpg
        • some_pic.jpg
    • 77377
      • images
    • 88723
      • images
        • 22.jpg
        • some_pic.jpg

After the script is run, the situation would look like this:

  • master folder
    • 18556
      • images
        • 2234.jpg
        • 2234_n.jpg
    • 47772
      • images
        • 2234.jpg
        • 2234_n.jpg
        • some_pic.jpg
    • 77377
      • images
    • 88723
      • images
        • 22.jpg
        • 22_n.jpg
        • some_pic.jpg

Update: Sorry about the typo, I accidentally put 2235 into 47772. Update 2: Regarding the 2nd comment on the mathematical.coffee's answer, the OS I am currently on (at work) is MacOS, but my main machines are running CentOS and Ubuntu at home, so I just assumed my situation applies to all unix based systems.

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Ooh, a challenge. I expect the answer to be based on the find command. –  Ray Toal Mar 5 '12 at 5:38
2  
Is the change of master folder/47772/images/2234.jpg to 2235.jpg a typo? (Please say yes! Or fix it and I can delete this comment.) Out of curiosity; can there be more than one pure-numeric JPG file in a given images directory? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 5 '12 at 6:07
    
Oh dear, yes! Sorry! –  Swader Mar 5 '12 at 6:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the -regex switch to find to match /somefolder/images/numeric.jpg:

find -type f -regex './[^/]+/images/[0-9]+\.jpg$'

Edit: refinement from @JonathanLeffler: add -type f to find so it only finds files (ie don't match a directory called '12345.jpg').

The ./[^/]+/ is for the first folder (if that first folder is always numeric too you can change it to [0-9]+).

The [0-9]+\.jpg$ means a jpg file with file name only being numeric. You might want to change the jpg to jpe?g to allow .jpeg, but that's up to you.

Then it's a matter of copying these to xxx_n.jpg.

for f in $(find -type f -regex './[^/]+/images/[0-9]+\.jpg$')
do
    # replace '.jpg' in $f (filename) with '_n.jpg'
    newf=${f/\.jpg/_n\.jpg}
    # see if this new file exists
    if [ ! -f $newf ];
    then
        # if not exists, copy it.
        cp "$f" "$newf"
    fi
done
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2  
+1: About the only refinement I see is adding -type f to the find, just to make sure you only deal with files. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 5 '12 at 6:13
1  
+1: The OP didn't say which UNIX / Linux or if he can use the GNU findutils, so it is fair to assume he can. You could however add a note that the standard find does not support the -regex option. –  Christian.K Mar 5 '12 at 6:22
    
Indeed, updating main question. Never knew there was a difference. –  Swader Mar 5 '12 at 6:26
    
Thank you math coffee :) –  Swader Mar 5 '12 at 18:18

What should be the logic behind the renames in Folder 47772? If we assume you want to rename all the files just consisting of numbers to numbers + _n

With mmv you could write it like:

mmv "[0-9][0-9]*.jpg" "#1#2#3_n.jpg"

Note: mmv is for moving; mcp is for copying, and so is more appropriate to this question.

Question of Vader: Well I checked the man page and the problem is that it's a bit strange. I was thinking [0-9]* would match zero or more numbers. I turns out that this assumption was wrong. The problem is that I could not tell I want two or more numbers at the start of the name.

So [0-9][0-9]* matches a name starting with at least two numbers (after that it takes all the rest up to the .. Now every [0-9] is one pattern and so I had to make the to pattern into: "#1#2#3_n.jpg" With e.g 1234.jpg I have #1 = 1; #2 = 2, #3 = 34 So

#1#2#3 -> 1234;  _n appends the _n and .jpg the extension

However it would rename also files with 12some_other_stuff.jpg sot 12some_other_stuff_n.jpg. It's not ideal but achieves in this context what was intended.

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It's not rename; it is copy to a new name - if the new name does not exist yet. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 5 '12 at 6:08
    
Sorry than it is mcp instead of mmv. –  Friedrich Mar 5 '12 at 6:13
    
If this is really so simple, then this would be the better solution for this specific case. Could you perhaps elaborate on the syntax a bit? –  Swader Mar 5 '12 at 6:35

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