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I've got a class attribute in a Moose class, but I'd like it to work like Class::Data::Inheritable in terms of a subclass overriding the parent's value. That is, the subclass inherits the parent's value until the setter is called on the subclass, at which point the values become distinct. e.g.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

{
    package Foo;
    use Moose;
    use MooseX::ClassAttribute;
    class_has Item => ( is => 'rw' );
}

{
    package Bar;
    use Moose;
    extends 'Foo';
}

Foo->Item(4);

# This prints "4, 4" as expected
#
print join( ", ", Foo->Item(), Bar->Item() ) . "\n"; 

Bar->Item(5);

# Would like this to print "4, 5", but it prints "5, 5"
#
print join( ", ", Foo->Item(), Bar->Item() ) . "\n"; 

What's the best way to get this effect, with MooseX::ClassAttribute or otherwise? Seems like desirable behavior for any class w/class-data that expects to be inherited from.

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1  
FWIW Class::Data::Inheritable doesn't conflict with Moose. –  Schwern Mar 5 '12 at 9:02
1  
Schwern: That may be true, although Moose objects have to inherit from Moose::Object so at the very least there would be multiple inheritance involved, which bothers me. Also you don't get any of the Moose attribute declaration goodness that MooseX::ClassAttribute gives you. –  Jonathan Swartz Mar 5 '12 at 17:57

1 Answer 1

I know you asked for inheritance but may be roles would help you to get your problem solved in a different way.

Try it with a simple example:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl

use strict;
use feature 'say';

{
    package Bomb;
    use Moose::Role;
    sub fuse    { say "Bomb explode" }
    sub explode { say "Bomb fuse"}
}

{
    package Spouse;
    use Moose::Role;
    sub fuse    { say "Spouse explode"}
    sub explode { say "Spouse fuse"}
}

{
    package PracticalJoke;
    use Moose;
    with 'Bomb'   => { excludes => 'explode' },
         'Spouse' => { excludes => 'fuse' };
}

my $joke = PracticalJoke->new();
$joke->fuse();
$joke->explode();

And with the 'excludes' you can exactly control what should happen.

Have a look at why roles are awsome and the slides from Ovid about inheritance versus roles.

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You may want to summarize those links here in your answer; that way if those links ever go away you won't run the risk of it ever being removed. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 3 '13 at 14:55
    
Okay. I added the example from the mentioned link. –  smartmeta Feb 4 '13 at 17:45

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