Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a networking framework that I am writing (Trying to implement reliable layer over UDP). I have this receive function that accepts a pointer to a packet object. The network framework then does a whole load of stuff to receive a packet, and sets the value of the packet pointer to this packet. But this happens a few functions deep. So what I am essentially wondering is, why this doesn't something like this work for me: (very basic example to show you what i mean)

void Main()
{
   int* intPointer = NULL;
   SomeFunction(intPointer);
   //intPointer is still null?
}
void SomeFunction(int* outInt)
{
   SomeOtherFunction(outInt);
}

void SomeOtherFunction(int* outInt)
{
   outInt = new int(5);
}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

SomeOtherFunction is passed a pointer by value, so the assignment only changes the local copy of the passed address.

To make this work, pass the pointer by reference:

void Main()
{
   int* intPointer = NULL;
   SomeFunction(intPointer);
   //intPointer is still null?
}
void SomeFunction(int*& outInt)
{
   SomeOtherFunction(outInt);
}

void SomeOtherFunction(int*& outInt)
{
   outInt = new int(5);
}

Having said that, is there something wrong with using a return value?

void Main()
{
   int* intPointer = SomeFunction(intPointer);
   //intPointer is still null?
}
int* SomeFunction()
{
   return SomeOtherFunction();
}

int* SomeOtherFunction()
{
   return new int(5);
}

[ Update following comment. ]

Well, if you have a return value indicating the status, presumably indicating whether or not the integer has been read, then what you really want is (using bool as a placeholder for your specific status):

void Main()
{
   int intPointer = 0;
   if (SomeFunction(intPointer) == true)
   {
       // read something
   }
   else
   {
       // failed to read.
   }
}
bool SomeFunction(int& outInt)
{
   return SomeOtherFunction(outInt);
}

bool SomeOtherFunction(int& outInt)
{
   outInt = 5;
   return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
my return value is actually something like ReceiveStatus (and it would return ReceiveStatus ::Successful). So i cant return the status of the transfer and the packet that was received at the same time. anyway thanks for that man! –  Prodigga Mar 5 '12 at 6:06
add comment

It is better to use empty std::auto(unique)_ptr passed as reference to the SomeOtherFunction and SomeFunction. If SomeFunction raises exception, you won't have memory leak for memory allocated in SomeOtherFunction

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.