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I have an array, size can be up to 10000. It holds only 1/2/3/4. I need to find how many 1s, 2s, 3s and 4s are there in the array. What's the fastest way of doing it? My language of use is Java. My piece of code-

for(int i=0; i<myArray.length;i++){
            int element = myArray[i];
            if(element == 1){
                onesCount++;
            }
            else if(element == 2){
                twosCount++;
            }
            else if(element == 3){
                threesCount++;
            }
            else
                foursCount++;
}

I hope there's a good solution.

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you want a quick method, or the quickest method? :) –  Ahmad Y. Saleh Mar 5 '12 at 7:18
1  
Since you are anyway going to parse the entire array, your run time would have to be O(n) no matter how you do it. –  noMAD Mar 5 '12 at 7:19
    
quickest method. –  sans481 Mar 5 '12 at 7:19
    
What have you tried? –  Averroes Mar 5 '12 at 7:19
    
@Averroes- See my edit. –  sans481 Mar 5 '12 at 7:25

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted
int count[5]; //initialize this to 0
for(int i = 0; i<n; i++)
{
count[array[i]]+=1;
}
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1  
Although it is still O(n), this one can save a few comparisons. –  Bob Wang Mar 5 '12 at 7:59
    
OTOH, it now has to update an array on the heap instead of a local int on the stack. –  Thilo Mar 5 '12 at 8:00
    
This might be better then mine. Doing this unsafe would win, I assume. –  Haymo Kutschbach Mar 5 '12 at 8:01
    
Uh. just realized this is Java. So no unsafe here, sorry. –  Haymo Kutschbach Mar 5 '12 at 8:57
1  
@noMAD ++count[array[i]]; would be more faster according to stackoverflow.com/questions/561588/…. Won't it be? –  sans481 Mar 5 '12 at 10:37

There is no solution essentially better than yours. Could be more flexible, but not faster. Everything has to do at least that single pass through the whole array.

The only area of performance optimization would be to avoid doing this operation, for example by keeping track of the counters as the array is updated. If that is worth the trouble (probably not) depends on how often you need to do this, how big the array is, and what else you need to do with it.

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You will have separate counters for the array entries. Each will be incremented upon a new matching number is found, so you have to visit every index at least once, that is to say you will have an algorithm working in O(n) time. Switch statement could be preferred instead of multiple if-else statements:

int[] array = new int[10000];
// ... populate array
int[] counters = new int[4];

for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
{
    int temp = array[i];
    switch (temp) {
    case 1:
        counters[0]++;
        break;
    case 2:
        counters[1]++;
        break;
    case 3:
        counters[2]++;
        break;
    case 4:
        counters[3]++;
        break;
    default:
        // to do.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oops! I forgot switch case. It might eliminate good amount of comparisons. But why array of counters instead of count variables(like in my question). Any reason? –  sans481 Mar 5 '12 at 9:48
    
no specific reason but it is more flexible. if you want to print all counters, you will just iterate over counters array with a for loop. isn't that good? –  Juvanis Mar 5 '12 at 9:53

If you are using Java 7 you could make use of the Fork/Join Framework. The complexity will still be O(n)... but it may be faster for a large array

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+1. Not at all sure if this makes sense in this case, but in general, this is a perfect task for parallel processing. –  Thilo Mar 5 '12 at 8:01
1  
@Thilo, Yes, overhead of thread creation may be too big for this operation, but I think it's worth trying –  hage Mar 5 '12 at 8:06

You can do it using one pass through the array.

Just have yourself an array of four elements, each representing one of your values (1/2/3/4) and for each element in the original array you increase the count at the corresponding place in the "count" array. That would make it O(n).

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If you can use a Map or a custom class instead. If you can't you have to iterate through the whole array. If you don't habe performance problems right now with this, I sugest to just do the iteration.

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if the switch version (deporter) or noMAD's version is not best, try this:

for (int i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
    int element = myArray[i];
    if (element > 2) {
        if (element == 4) {
            foursCount++;
        } else 
            threesCount++;
    } else {
        if (element == 2) 
            twosCount++;
        else 
            onesCount++; 
    }
}

It may save a tiny amount of comparison. But it depends on the true data. If you are lucky with the data, the straightforward version may do better.

Besides that, using parallelism is always worth a try for large data.

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I don't think you'll get any faster than this:

final int[] counts = new int[5];
final int length = array.length - 1;
for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
   counts[array[i]]++;
}

Note that in the for loop, array.length is not referenced. It is put into a local final int, this avoids a dereference of array.length in each iteration.

I benchmarked this vs. this method that uses a switch..case statement and only local stack variables:

    int count1 = 0;
    int count2 = 0;
    int count3 = 0;
    int count4 = 0;

    for (int i = array.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        switch (array[i]) {
        case 1:
            count1++;
            break;
        case 2:
            count2++;
            break;
        case 3:
            count3++;
            break;
        case 4:
            count4++;
            break;
        }
    }

The results were the first method took 17300 nanoseconds, and the switch..case method took 79800 nanoseconds. [UPDATED: forgot to divide the nanoseconds by 10. I ran each method 10 times.]

Note: I did warn-up the VM first before benchmarking.

share|improve this answer
    
how did you measure? release build? JIT optimizations? Debugger attached? data size? repetitions? cache aware? Could you post some code? At best: assembly for both versions? –  Haymo Kutschbach Mar 5 '12 at 8:08
    
I ran the VM with '-server' and warmed it up with 11000 calls to the two methods (the server JIT hotspot compile threshold is 10000 iterations). Then used System.nanoTime() before and after calling each of the two methods 10 times. Yes, compiled with debug. No, no debugger attached. Data-size of 10000 integers. –  brettw Mar 5 '12 at 8:15
    
Running javap to dump the two methods' bytecode is an exercise left to the reader. Suffice it to say that the first method is 32 'lines' of bytecode, and the second method 105. The second method uses the 'tableswitch' bytecode along with lots of 'goto' jumps and in the end is much less efficient (as evidenced by the benchmark). –  brettw Mar 5 '12 at 8:26
    
Accessing larger amounts of memory in reverse is often slower than accessing it in order as the cache can pre-fetch the data you will need. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 5 '12 at 8:33
    
@Peter Lawrey, true that. I changed my code and it shaved 300ns off of the average (now measuring 17300ns). –  brettw Mar 5 '12 at 8:40

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