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The problem in question can be found at http://projecteuler.net/problem=14

I'm trying what I think is a novel solution. At least it is not brute-force. My solution works on two assumptions:

1) The less times you have iterate through the sequence, the quicker you'll get the answer. 2) A sequence will necessarily be longer than the sequences of each of its elements

So I implemented an array of all possible numbers that could appear in the sequence. The highest number starting a sequence is 999999 (as the problem only asks you to test numbers less than 1,000,000); therefore the highest possible number in any sequence is 3 * 999999 + 1 = 2999998 (which is even, so would then be divided by 2 for the next number in the sequence). So the array need only be of this size. (In my code the array is actually 2999999 elements, as I have included 0 so that each number matches its array index. However, this isn't necessary, it is for comprehension).

So once a number comes in a sequence, its value in the array becomes 0. If subsequent sequences reach this value, they will know not to proceed any further, as it is assumed they will be longer.

However, when i run the code I get the following error, at the line introducing the "wh:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: 3188644

For some reason it is trying to access an index of the above value, which shouldn't be reachable as it is over the possible max of 29999999. Can anyone understand why this is happening?

Please note that I have no idea if my assumptions are actually sound. I'm an amateur programmer and not a mathematician. I'm experimenting. Hopefully I'll find out whether it works as soon as I get the indexing correct.

Code is as follows:

private static final int MAX_START = 999999;
private static final int MAX_POSSIBLE = 3 * MAX_START + 1;

public long calculate()
{
    int[] numbers = new int[MAX_POSSIBLE + 1];
    for(int index = 0; index <= MAX_POSSIBLE; index++)
    {
        numbers[index] = index;
    }

    int longestChainStart = 0;

    for(int index = 1; index <= numbers.length; index++)
    {
        int currentValue = index;


        if(numbers[currentValue] != 0)
        {
            longestChainStart = currentValue;

            while(numbers[currentValue] != 0 && currentValue != 1)
            {   
                numbers[currentValue] = 0;

                if(currentValue % 2 == 0)
                {
                    currentValue /= 2;
                }
                else
                {
                    currentValue = 3 * currentValue + 1;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return longestChainStart;
}
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1  
I suspect it will be obvious(ish) if you print out the value of currentValue each time. It might take a bit to print, but I think you're just growing over your current value because you've hit an odd number that's above a third your max value. –  Joel Mar 5 '12 at 8:54
3  
I don't understand why you think 2999998 is the max possible number... If you start at 999999, you get: 999999 -> 2999998 -> 1499999 -> 4499998, but 4499998 > 2999998... –  Sorin Mar 5 '12 at 10:32
    
I'm realising that now. For some reason I though that, since anything odd will become even, it will be reduced again and everything would be fine. Didn't think about the fact that the increases are of a far greater magnitude than the decreases. Thanks both of you for pointing this out. –  Swiftslide Mar 5 '12 at 21:49
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2 Answers 2

Given that you can't (easily) put a limit on the possible maximum number of a sequence, you might want to try a different approach. I might suggest something based on memoization.

Suppose you've got an array of size 1,000,000. Each entry i will represent the length of the sequence from i to 1. Remember, you don't need the sequences themselves, but rather, only the length of the sequences. You can start filling in your table at 1---the length is 0. Starting at 2, you've got length 1, and so on. Now, say we're looking at entry n, which is even. You can look at the length of the sequence at entry n/2 and just add 1 to that for the value at n. If you haven't calculated n/2 yet, just do the normal calculations until you get to a value you have calculated. A similar process holds if n is odd.

This should bring your algorithm's running time down significantly, and prevent any problems with out-of-bounds errors.

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You can solve this by this way

import java.util.LinkedList;
public class Problem14 {

public static void main(String[] args) {

LinkedList<Long> list = new LinkedList<Long>();
 long length =0;
 int res  =0;
 for(int j=10; j<1000000; j++)
 {
    long i=j;
    while(i!=1)
     {
        if(i%2==0)
        {  
            i =i/2;
            list.add(i);    
        }
        else
        {
            i =3*i+1;      
            list.add(i);
        }      
     }  
 if(list.size()>length)
   {
     length =list.size();
     res=j;
   }
    list.clear();   

 }
System.out.println(res+ " highest nuber and its length " + length);

}}
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