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I have several CONST's defined on some classes, and want to get a list of them. For example:

class Profile {
    const LABEL_FIRST_NAME = "First Name";
    const LABEL_LAST_NAME = "Last Name";
    const LABEL_COMPANY_NAME = "Company";
}

Is there any way to get a list of the CONST's defined on the Profile class? As far as I can tell, the closest option(get_defined_constants()) won't do the trick.

What I actually need is a list of the constant names - something like this:

array('LABEL_FIRST_NAME',
    'LABEL_LAST_NAME',
    'LABEL_COMPANY_NAME')

Or:

array('Profile::LABEL_FIRST_NAME', 
    'Profile::LABEL_LAST_NAME',
    'Profile::LABEL_COMPANY_NAME')

Or even:

array('Profile::LABEL_FIRST_NAME'=>'First Name', 
    'Profile::LABEL_LAST_NAME'=>'Last Name',
    'Profile::LABEL_COMPANY_NAME'=>'Company')
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You can do this using reflection. Search for "Print class constants" on that page to see an example. –  n3rd Jun 5 '09 at 15:16
    
Using Reflection, and a ReflectionClass on Cl, you can use the function getConstants nz.php.net/manual/en/class.reflectionclass.php –  Tim Ebenezer Dec 9 '09 at 9:54
    
Reflection will be your savior. –  Björn Dec 9 '09 at 9:55
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9 Answers 9

up vote 110 down vote accepted

You can use Reflection for this. Note that if you are doing this a lot you may want to looking at caching the result.

<?php
class Profile {
    const LABEL_FIRST_NAME = "First Name";
    const LABEL_LAST_NAME = "Last Name";
    const LABEL_COMPANY_NAME = "Company";
}


$refl = new ReflectionClass('Profile');
print_r($refl->getConstants());

Output:

Array
(
    ['LABEL_FIRST_NAME'] => First Name
    ['LABEL_LAST_NAME'] => Last Name
    ['LABEL_COMPANY_NAME'] => Company
)
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks! –  Brock Boland Jun 6 '09 at 5:37
3  
Two minor NBs: first, in 5.3, Profile can be used as the argument to the reflector constructor, without quotes (a simple class name); second, to be completely clear, the resulting array’s keys are strings, not constants as the formatting here might be taken to suggest. (Worth mentioning only as the fn is undocumented.) –  Benji XVI May 16 '11 at 23:08
10  
@Benji XVI In 5.3 if you have notices turned on, you won't be able to use Profile without the quotes, as it will show the following error: Notice: Use of undefined constant Profile - assumed 'Profile'. So I suggest keeping the quotes 'Profile' –  toneplex Jun 28 '11 at 15:28
1  
@toneplex You’re right – sorry. PHP, eh? –  Benji XVI Jun 30 '11 at 17:10
2  
It is good to define constants related logic inside of class, so you don't need to hardcode constructor argument but use __CLASS__ instead. –  Luke Adamczewski Mar 27 '13 at 10:57
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This

 $reflector = new ReflectionClass('Status');
 var_dump($reflector->getConstants());
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1  
+1 This would be it since I can't find any built-in procedural PHP functions for getting class constants, which is a bit of a shame. –  BoltClock Oct 15 '10 at 23:14
1  
Probably because there is little need for it. The OP might want to do a meta-configuration by setting types as all constants this class has, which in most cases, and in my granted limited opinion, are probably better served with either inheritance or a static array variable with the types (leaving room for constants with other meanings / use). –  Wrikken Oct 15 '10 at 23:19
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Per the PHP docs comments, if you're able to use the ReflectionClass (PHP 5):

function GetClassConstants($sClassName) {
    $oClass = new ReflectionClass($sClassName);
    return $oClass->getConstants();
}

Source is here.

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In PHP5 you can use Reflection: (manual reference)

$class = new ReflectionClass('Profile');
$consts = $class->getConstants();
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Use token_get_all(). Namely:

<?php
header('Content-Type: text/plain');

$file = file_get_contents('Profile.php');
$tokens = token_get_all($file);

$const = false;
$name = '';
$constants = array();
foreach ($tokens as $token) {
    if (is_array($token)) {
        if ($token[0] != T_WHITESPACE) {
            if ($token[0] == T_CONST && $token[1] == 'const') {
                $const = true;
                $name = '';
            } else if ($token[0] == T_STRING && $const) {
                $const = false;
                $name = $token[1];
            } else if ($token[0] == T_CONSTANT_ENCAPSED_STRING && $name) {
                $constants[$name] = $token[1];
                $name = '';
            }
        }
    } else if ($token != '=') {
        $const = false;
        $name = '';
    }
}

foreach ($constants as $constant => $value) {
    echo "$constant = $value\n";
}
?>

Output:

LABEL_FIRST_NAME = "First Name"
LABEL_LAST_NAME = "Last Name"
LABEL_COMPANY_NAME = "Company"
share|improve this answer
    
token_get_all is great –  Tom Haigh Jun 5 '09 at 16:19
1  
+1, even though I would say this is an excellent time to use Reflection as mentioned by other posters, it is also important to understand the workings "under-the-hood" and be able to do without them or replicate them if necessary. Good show. –  Dereleased Dec 2 '09 at 19:26
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Using ReflectionClass and getConstants() gives exactly what you want:

<?php
class Cl {
    const AAA = 1;
    const BBB = 2;
}
$r = new ReflectionClass('Cl');
print_r($r->getConstants());

Output:

Array
(
    [AAA] => 1
    [BBB] => 2
)
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Yeah, you use reflection. Look at the output of

<?
Reflection::export(new ReflectionClass('YourClass'));
?>

That should give you the idea of what you'll be looking at.

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Why not put them in a class variable as an array to begin with? Makes it easier to loop thru.

private $_data = array("production"=>0 ...);
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1  
in array you will not see code completion hints... –  Denis Oct 6 '10 at 18:49
1  
Because arrays aren't constants? If you implement something that's supposed to be a constant as a variable then you risk it getting inadvertently changed or unset. In other words you can't depend on them remaining constant. –  GordonM Jul 21 '11 at 8:29
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Eventually with namespaces:

namespaces enums;
class enumCountries 
{
  const CountryAustria          = 1 ;
  const CountrySweden           = 24;
  const CountryUnitedKingdom    = 25;
}

namespace Helpers;
class Helpers
{
  static function getCountries()
  {
    $c = new \ReflectionClass('\enums\enumCountries');
    return $c->getConstants();
  }
}

print_r(\Helpers\Helpers::getCountries());
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protected by casperOne Mar 2 '12 at 17:34

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