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When I run several background processes my output of the command jobs is for example:

[1]-  RUNNING                  nohup somecommand1 &
[2]+  RUNNING                  nohup somecommand2 &

What do the "+" and "-" chars after the job id mean?

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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's in the man-page for jobs under STDOUT:

> man jobs

The character '+' identifies the job that would be used as a default for the fg or bg utilities; this job can also be specified using the job_id %+ or "%%" . The character '-' identifies the job that would become the default if the current default job were to exit; this job can also be specified using the job_id %-.

So the job marked with '+' is the one that will be activated by 'fg'.

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Thanks! You certainly have the better linux distribution. When I hit man jobs I only get a very brief description of the parameters. –  Benjamin Mar 5 '12 at 10:03
    
That's interesting, what distribution are you running? I'm running Arch Linux. –  ibab Mar 5 '12 at 10:07
    
Scientific Linux, which is based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. I get a general bash manual page and the section for jobs is just a list of parameters. No STDOUT. –  Benjamin Mar 5 '12 at 10:14
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The + means that that process was the last one running before putting in background. The - means it was the second to last before putting in background.

If you do "fg" your job number 2 (the +) will be put into foreground, unless you explicitly state "fg %1", which will put the job with the - into foreground.

Example:

rock:$ sleep 30m &
[1] 25808
[1002 ~]
rock:$ sleep 45m &
[2] 25813
[1003 ~]
rock:$ jobs
[1]-  Running                 sleep 30m &
[2]+  Running                 sleep 45m &
[1004 ~]
rock:$ fg
sleep 45m
[2]+  Stopped                 sleep 45m
[1005 ~]
rock:$ jobs
[1]-  Running                 sleep 30m &
[2]+  Stopped                 sleep 45m
[1006 ~]
rock:$ fg %1
sleep 30m
[1]+  Stopped                 sleep 30m
[1007 ~]
rock:$ jobs
[1]+  Stopped                 sleep 30m
[2]-  Stopped                 sleep 45m

Pay attention to the last rows, where + and - changed places.

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