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This is about as beginner as a question gets, but I can't find anything in the ruby docs or on google that helps.

It's a very simple question; how do I commit an ActiveRecord object to the database?

I have my user.rb file in models which just contains the two lines;

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
end

I have a users table in postgres that has only two fields, id and email.

And I have the following line in my signup controller;

User.new(:email => email)

It doesn't kick an error so I assume that the new User object is created just fine, and that it's happy about being given an 'email' field, which leads me to believe that it is correctly reading its own field list from the database, but no record is created.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do two things to persist an object to the database:

User.new(:email => email).save

Or:

User.create(:email => email)

You're right that this is a fairly beginnery question, but that's nothing to be ashamed of! You should probably read the Ruby on Rails Getting Started Guide which introduces this and many more helpful concepts.

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Many thanks, I will also read the guide - I'd skipped out a lot of the RoR 101 type guides as they seem to cover a lot of ground I'm familiar with having been a PHP dev for a number of years. Just need a jump-start into ruby I guess. –  lynks Mar 5 '12 at 11:30
    
while you're here, I assume I can use the User object to then pull back out the id (autoincrement) field after I have run the save function? –  lynks Mar 5 '12 at 11:32
    
Yep, something like this: @user = User.create; @user.id –  Veraticus Mar 5 '12 at 11:35
    
If you want to know if the save failed (perhaps due to validations failing), you can use the 'bang' versions of the above - e.g. User.new(:email => email).save! See api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/… for more. –  novemberkilo Mar 5 '12 at 11:41

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